Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: Known from two Utah counties, Garfield and Wayne (Franklin 2005).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: Known from Garfield, San Juan, and Wayne Counties, Utah (Franklin 2005). Has also been found in Apache County Arizona, Montezuma County, Colorado, and San Juan County, New Mexico (SEINet database as of September 2012; K. Heil, and S. O'Kane pers.comm., 2012).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Erigeron awapensis S.L. Welsh:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Erigeron abajoensis Cronquist:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 5–15(–24) cm; taprooted, caudices branches relatively thick and short, retaining old leaf bases. Stems ascending to decumbent (greenish proximally), usually loosely strigose (hairs ascending, attenuate, basal cells erect), uncommonly hirsute or hirtellous (hairs spreading-deflexed), eglandular. Leaves basal (persistent) and cauline; basal blades usually oblanceolate, 15–70 × 2–6(–8) mm (bases attenuate), margins entire (apices rounded to obtuse); cauline blades linear to linear-oblong or narrowly lanceolate-oblong, mostly 10–40 × 1.5–4 mm, gradually reduced distally; faces strigose, eglandular. Heads 1–4. Involucres 3.7–5.2 × (5–)10–11 mm. Phyllaries in 2–3(–4) series, strigose to strigulose or finely hirsuto-villous, minutely glandular. Ray florets 35–60; corollas blue to pink or white, 5–6 mm, laminae weakly coiling. Disc corollas 2.5–4 mm. Cypselae 1.5–2 mm, 2-nerved, faces strigose; pappi: outer of setae, inner of 12–20 bristles.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Erigeron awapensis S. L. Welsh
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Type Information

Isotype for Erigeron abajoensis Cronquist
Catalog Number: US 765323
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): P. A. Rydberg & A. O. Garrett
Year Collected: 1911
Locality: Abajo Mts., Utah, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 3000 to 3300
  • Isotype: Cronquist, A. J. 1947. Brittonia. 6: 168.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Sagebrush and pinyon-juniper communities at 2135-2260 m elevation.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments: Open, often rocky places in pinyon-juniper to spruce fir communities at 2100-3400 m elevation in the mountains. Limestone and igneous substrates; clay loam.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5

Comments: Three Utah EOs, all with last observation dates 19 years or more ago (EO data in the NatureServe central database as of August 2012). SEINet specimen database has 2001 specimens from two Utah counties (SEINet database as of September 2012).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 1 - 20

Comments: Five Utah EOs, all with last observation dates 15 years or more ago (EO data in the NatureServe central database as of August 2012). SEINet specimen database has 2001 specimens from 3 Utah counties, one 2001 specimen from Arizona, and one 2004 specimen from New Mexico (SEINet database as of September 2012). Also found at one location in Colorado (K. Heil, and S. O'Kane pers.comm., 2012).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G1 - Critically Imperiled

Reasons: A Utah endemic restricted to the Awapa Plateau. Known from few collections in two counties.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G1 - Critically Imperiled

Reasons: Endemic to the Four Corners area of Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico. There are few collections.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Degree of Threat: Unknown

Comments: Possible threats include livestock grazing and mineral exploration.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Degree of Threat: High - medium

Comments: Potential threats include livestock grazing and trampling (A. Hazelton, pers. comm., 2012). A possible threat is mineral exploration.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Risks

Stewardship Overview: Revisit sites. Further document the species' range, status, and trends.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Stewardship Overview: Prevent impacts from grazing. Revisit sites. Further document the species' range, status, and trends.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Erigeron abajoensis

Erigeron abajoensis (Abajo Fleabane) is a species of Erigeron in the family Asteraceae, native to Utah in the southwest United States, where it grows on sunny, dry, rocky slopes generally at elevations of 2,270 to 3,400 m.

It is a short (5 to 25 cm tall) perennial plant. The leaves are narrowly oblanceolate (i.e. with a broad-rounded apex and a tapering base), set with stiff, straight bristles and located at the base of the stem. The flowers are blue or white, produced in the summer.

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Erigeron abajoensis is a segregate of E. caespitosus, separated from the latter only by its strigose (versus hirsute) stems and leaves and greater tendency for 1-nerved leaves. Further, some populations of E. abajoensis have plants variable in orientation of stem vestiture [both antrorsely appressed and deflexed; e.g., Cronquist 9430, Garfield Co., Utah (BRIT, NY); Heil and Clifford 17919, Apache Co., Ariz. (BRIT, SJNM)] and similar variation in cauline vestiture also occurs in E. caespitosus.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Recognized by Welsh (1993), but Cronquist (1994), Flora of North America Editorial Committee (2006), and Welsh et al. (2008) place in synonymy with Erigeron abajoensis.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments: Flora of North America's (2006) concept of Erigeron abajoensis includes (Kartesz 1994 and 1999) E. abajoensis and E. awapensis.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!