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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Plains to High Altitude, Cultivated, Native of Mediterranean Region"
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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Tamil Nadu: All districts
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Leaf blades oblong to obovate or spatulate, 25–65+ × 8–25+ mm, coarsely 1-pinnate or not lobed, ultimate margins dentate or entire. Ray corollas golden yellow, laminae oblong-ovate, 8–20 mm. Ray cypselae weakly triquetrous, 2.5–3 mm, obscurely, if at all, winged, lateral faces 2-ribbed, abaxial faces 3-ribbed; disc cypselae ± compressed-columnar, 2–3 mm, 10-ribbed, not winged. 2n = 18.
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Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

Habit: Herb
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Synonym

Chrysanthemum segetum Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 889. 1753; Xantophtalmum segetum (Linnaeus) Schultz-Bipontinus
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Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
sporangium of Bremia lactucae parasitises live leaf of Chrysanthemum segetum
Remarks: season: 9-10
Other: unusual host/prey

Foodplant / parasite
Golovinomyces cichoracearum parasitises live Chrysanthemum segetum

Foodplant / parasite
Oidium chrysanthemi parasitises live capitulum of Chrysanthemum segetum

Foodplant / parasite
sporangium of Peronospora radii parasitises live flower of Chrysanthemum segetum

Foodplant / parasite
colony of sporangium of Peronospora segetum parasitises live Chrysanthemum segetum

Foodplant / parasite
amphigenous telium of Puccinia cnici-oleracei parasitises live leaf of Chrysanthemum segetum
Remarks: season: 7-11
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / spot causer
amphigenous colony of Ramularia hyphomycetous anamorph of Ramularia bellunensis causes spots on live leaf of Chrysanthemum segetum

Foodplant / spot causer
mostly epiphyllous pycnidium of Septoria coelomycetous anamorph of Septoria leucanthemi causes spots on live leaf of Chrysanthemum segetum
Remarks: season: 5-9

Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Trupanea amoena feeds within capitulum of Chrysanthemum segetum
Remarks: Other: uncertain

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Chrysanthemum segetum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Chrysanthemum segetum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 8
Specimens with Barcodes: 8
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Glebionis segetum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Management

These species are introduced in Switzerland.
  • Aeschimann, D. & C. Heitz. 2005. Synonymie-Index der Schweizer Flora und der angrenzenden Gebiete (SISF). 2te Auflage. Documenta Floristicae Helvetiae N° 2. Genève.   http://www.crsf.ch/ External link.
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© Info Flora (CRSF/ZDSF) & Autoren 2005

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Wikipedia

Glebionis segetum

Chrysanthemum segetum.jpg

Glebionis segetum (syn. Chrysanthemum segetum) is a species of the genus Glebionis, probably native only to the eastern Mediterranean region. Common names include corn marigold and corn daisy.

It is a herbaceous perennial plant growing to 80 cm tall, with spirally arranged, deeply lobed leaves 5–20 cm long. The flowers are bright yellow, produced in capitulae (flowerheads) 3.5-5.5 cm in diameter, with a ring of ray florets and a centre of disc florets.

It is widely naturalised outside of its native range, colonising western and central Europe with early human agriculture; it can be an invasive weed in some areas.

It was formerly treated in the genus Chrysanthemum, but under a 1999 decision of the International Botanical Congress, that genus has been redefined with a different circumscription to include the economically important florist's chrysanthemum (now Chrysanthemum indicum).

The corn marigold must have been a serious weed during the 13th century in Scotland; a law of Alexander II states if a farmer allows so much as a single plant to produce seed in amongst his crops, then he will be fined a sheep.[2]

In Crete and Greece, the leaves and the tender shoots of a variety called neromantilida (νερομαντηλίδα) are eaten raw in salads or browned in hot olive oil by the locals.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Plant List: A Working List of All Plant Species". Retrieved 30 July 2014. 
  2. ^ Dalrymple, Sir David (1776). Annals of Scotland. Pub. J. Murray. London. P. 338 -339.
  3. ^ Kleonikos G. Stavridakis , Κλεόνικος Γ. Σταυριδάκης (2006). Wild edible plants of Crete - Η Άγρια βρώσιμη χλωρίδα της Κρήτης. Rethymnon Crete. ISBN 960-631-179-1. 
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