Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Annuals, 20–200 cm. Stems simple or openly branched, loosely tomentose with fine single-celled hairs and villous with curled, septate hairs; teeth of wings to 25 mm, wing spines to 15 mm. Leaves: basal tapered to winged petioles, blades 10–25 cm, margins pinnately 6–10-lobed, abaxial faces tomentose, adaxial faces loosely tomentose and villous or ± glabrate; cauline sessile, shorter, less divided. Heads clustered in ± tight arrays of 5–20+ at ends of stems, usually sessile, 15–22 mm × 7–12 mm. Involucres cylindric to ellipsoid (appearing campanulate when pressed), 15–20 × 7–12 mm. Phyllaries linear-lanceolate, bases appressed, 2–2.5 mm wide, ± glabrate, and ascending, appendages 0.5–1.5 mm wide, narrowly scarious-margined, distally glabrous or minutely ciliolate, spine tips 1–2 mm, inner phyllaries with erect, straight, unarmed tips. Corollas pinkish, 10–14 mm; lobes 1.5–2.5 times longer than throat. Cypselae brown, 4–5 mm, finely 10–13-nerved; pappus bristles 10–15 mm. 2n = 54.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Carduus pycnocephalus Linnaeus var. tenuiflorus (Curtis) Fiori
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
Golovinomyces cichoracearum parasitises live Carduus tenuiflorus

Foodplant / spot causer
amphigenous colony of Ramularia hyphomycetous anamorph of Ramularia cynarae causes spots on live leaf of Carduus tenuiflorus

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Terellia serratulae feeds on Carduus tenuiflorus

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Carduus tenuiflorus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Carduus tenuiflorus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 7
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Carduus tenuiflorus

Carduus tenuiflorus, known variously as slender-flower thistle,[1] sheep thistle,[1] shore thistle,[1] slender thistle,[1] winged plumeless thistle,[2] winged slender thistle,[1] and winged thistle[1]) is a species of thistle.

It is native to Europe and North Africa. It is well-known on other continents, where it is an introduced species and noxious weed.

Distribution[edit]

Carduus tenuiflorus is native to western North Africa in: northern Algeria; Morocco; and Tunisa, and much of Europe in: Belgium; France, including Corsica; Ireland; Italy, including Sardinia and Sicily; the Netherlands; Portugal, Spain, including the Baleares (Balearic Islands); and the United Kingdom.[1]

Description[edit]

Carduus tenuiflorus may exceed 2 metres (6.6 ft) in height. Its tall stem is ridged with wings and has long spines which may be several centimeters in length. The dull olive-green leaves are lobed and wrinkled and may fold and crease themselves.

The inflorescences may hold up to 20 flower heads which are somewhat rounded, covered in wide, spiny phyllaries, and packed with pale pink to bright purple long-tubed disc florets. This is a tenacious weed of roadsides, fields, and disturbed areas.

Introduced species[edit]

It has become naturalised in Macaronesia, South Africa, India, Australasia, Southern South America, regions of the United States, and elsewhere.[1] It is an invasive species in California.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i  Carduus tenuiflorus was first described and published in Flora Londinensis 2(6): t. 55 (168,169). 1793. GRIN (May 9, 2011). "Carduus tenuiflorus information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved January 23, 2012. 
  2. ^ USDA
  3. ^ Cal-IPC (California Invasisive Plant Council): Carduus tenuiflorus . accessed 4.8.2013
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Carduus tenuiflorus has been reported from New Jersey, Texas, and Washington; I have not seen specimens from those states.

Carduus pycnocephalus and C. tenuiflorus are similar annuals with small, usually tightly clustered heads. The number of heads per capitulescence is usually ultimately greater in C. tenuiflorus, but early season plants of this species often have only a few heads. At the end of the growing season the fruiting heads of C. tenuiflorus are aggregated in dense, subspheric clusters. Stem wings tend to be more pronounced in C. tenuiflorus. Fresh corollas of C. pycnocephalus are rose-purple whereas those of C. tenuiflorus have a more pinkish tinge, but this difference is subtle and not reliable on herbarium material. The phyllaries of C. tenuiflorus are membranous-margined, more or less glabrate, and lack the short, stiff, upwardly appressed trichomes of C. pycnocephalus. All published chromosome counts for Carduus tenuiflorus from both Old and New World material are the same.

The two species sometimes grow in mixed populations and at times appear to intergrade. Hybridization has been reported in Europe (S. W. T. Batra et al. 1981) and is suspected to occur in California. Hybrids between C. pycnocephalus and C. tenuiflorus have been designated Carduus ×theriotii Rouy.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!