Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

Sometimes this plant is called "Small Snapdragon" and "Lesser Toadflax." It resembles the Linaria spp. (Toadflaxes) somewhat, except the throat of the corolla is less obstructed by fuzzy hairs and a palate from the lower lip. Dwarf Snapdragon is one of the members of a group of plants that colonize disturbed sterile soil; these species are ecologically significant because they help to stabilize and restore the fertility of the soil.
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Description

This adventive annual plant is about 4-12" tall, branching occasionally. The narrow round stems are covered with white hairs. The lower leaves are opposite, while the middle to upper leaves are alternate. These leaves are up to 1" long and 1/6" across. They are linear-oblong or linear-oblanceolate, with margins that are ciliate and smooth. From the axil of each middle or upper leaf, a single flower develops from a slender pedicel about 1" long. Sometimes a second flower develops from the leaf axil. Like the stems, these pedicels are covered with white hairs. The flowers are up to 1/4" in length. The corolla is tubular, with 5 spreading lobes in the front and a short spur in the back. The corolla has a small opening at the throat and is more or less two-lipped with 2 upper lobes and 3 lower lobes. It is variously colored, usually some shade of lavender, light purple, or white. Sometimes the corolla is bicolored, with the upper lobes lavender or light purple and the lower lobes white. There are usually a few hairs at the base of the lower lobes. The calyx is green or purplish green and quite hairy. It has 5 oblanceolate lobes that are almost as long as the corolla.  The blooming period occurs during the summer and lasts about a month. There is no noticeable floral scent. Each flower is replaced by an ovoid capsule that contains numerous brown seeds. These seeds are tiny enough to be dispersed by gusts of wind. The root system consists of a slender taproot. This plant spreads by reseeding itself.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Chaenorrhinum minus (L.) Lange:
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
sporangium of Peronospora linariae parasitises live Chaenorhinum minus

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Chaenorhinum minus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Chaenorhinum minus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 8
Specimens with Barcodes: 15
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

This little plant prefers dry sunny conditions and a sterile soil that is sandy or gravelly. It also grows in partial sun and less dry conditions, in which case it will become somewhat taller and more leafy. In fertile soil, this plant is not competitive with taller vegetation. Alkaline soil is readily tolerated. Range & Habitat
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Genus is erroneously spelled Chaenorrhinum (with two r's) in some sources, including Kartesz's 1994 Checklist. Apparently, Chaenorrhinum is not a published genus name, but rather, the spelling Chaenorhinum (D. C.) Reichenb. is published. Another published spelling of the genus name is Chaenarrhinum (L.) Lange.

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