Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Ranges from the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains of Los Angeles County to near the foothills of the Peninsular Ranges of southwestern Riverside County, California (Fish and Wildlife Service 1998).

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Calif.
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Historic Range:
U.S.A. (CA)

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs , evergreen, 1-4 m. Stems ± dimorphic, with elongate primary and short or somewhat elongate axillary shoots. Bark of 2d-year stems grayish or brownish purple, glabrous. Bud scales 2-3 mm, deciduous. Spines absent. Leaves 3-5(-7)-foliolate; petioles 0.2-0.7 cm. Leaflet blades thin but rigid; surfaces abaxially dull, papillose, adaxially dull, glaucous; terminal leaflet stalked in most or all leaves, blade 2.1-4.1 × 0.7-1.1 cm, 3-6 times as long as wide; lateral leaflet blades lance-ovate or lance-elliptic to lanceolate, 1-veined from base, base obtuse or rounded, margins plane or undulate, toothed, each with 4-11 teeth 0-1 mm high tipped with spines to 0.4-2 × 0.1-0.2 mm, apex acuminate. Inflorescences racemose, lax, 3-8-flowered, 2-5 cm; bracteoles membranous, apex acuminate, sometimes with proximal bracteoles leathery, spinose-acuminate. Flowers: anther filaments with distal pair of recurved lateral teeth. Berries yellowish red to red, not glaucous, spheric, 5-6 mm, juicy, solid.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Mahonia nevinii (A. Gray) Fedde
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: 2 habitat types: the margins of dry washes with sandy and gravelly substrates and alluvial shrub communities; and steep slopes with coarse soils and chaparral communities. The presence of groundwater flow may be a habitat requirement.

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Sandy slopes and washes in chaparral, coastal scrub, and riparian scrub; of conservation concern; 0-600m.
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20

Comments: Historically, the range of this species probably consisted of fewer than thirty scattered occurrences. There are twenty-one extant occurrences and at least seven populations of the thirtyish known occurrences have been extirpated (Fish and Wildlife Service 1998).

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General Ecology

Life Form

More info for the term: shrub

Shrub

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Fire Regime Table

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering winter-spring (Feb-May).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Berberis nevinii

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G1 - Critically Imperiled

Reasons: Mahonia nevinii is known from three counties in southern California. At least 7 of the 32 known populations have been extirpated and the remaining (twenty-one extant) populations are small (almost all have fewer than 10-20 individuals). The only large populations are in danger of being eliminated by encroaching urban development, off-road vehicles, horseback riding, invasive exotic species, vandalism, and altered fire regimes.

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Current Listing Status Summary

Status: Endangered
Date Listed: 10/13/1998
Lead Region:   California/Nevada Region (Region 8) 
Where Listed:


Population detail:

Listing status: E

For most current information and documents related to the conservation status and management of Berberis nevinii, see its USFWS Species Profile

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Threats

Comments: Construction, urban development, off-road vehicles, horseback riding, invasive exotic species, vandalism, and altered fire regimes (Fish and Wildlife Service 1998).

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Wikipedia

Mahonia nevinii

Mahonia nevinii (syn. Berberis nevinii), known by the common name Nevin's barberry, is a species of flowering shrub in the barberry family.

This plant is endemic to southern California, where it is known from very few occurrences in the chaparral of inland canyons and foothills. It is a federally and state listed endangered species. There are thought to be about 500 individuals remaining, with half of those being naturally occurring plants.[1] It is also widely cultivated in gardens and parks.

Description[edit]

Mahonia nevinii is an erect shrub approaching a maximum height of 4 metres (13 ft). It has a dense foliage of dark green to bluish-green spiny-toothed, spear-shaped leaflets.

It flowers in racemes of 3 to 5 bright yellow cup-shaped, layered blossoms. The fruit is a spherical reddish berry appearing in bunches, in the summer.

Some botanists treat Mahonia as part of the genus Berberis.[2][3][4][5]

Distribution[edit]

Populations were historically found in washes of the San Fernando Valley. [6] There are about 21 known populations of the plant remaining, and almost all of them have fewer than 20 individuals.[7] The populations are scattered throughout the San Gabriel Mountains and the Peninsular Ranges in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside Counties, its distribution possibly extending just into San Diego County.[7]

Threats to the species include habitat loss and degradation from urban development, fire suppression, and exotic plant species.[7]

Cultivation[edit]

Mahonia nevinii is cultivated as a drought-tolerant ornamental plant by specialty plant nurseries. [6] It is planted as a shrub in native plant and wildlife gardens, natural landscaping of parks in its range, drought tolerant landscaping, and for habitat restoration projects. [6]

It can serve as an impenetrable barrier hedge, due to the spiny-toothed dense foliage. With berries appearing in the summer, earlier/later than other chaparral plants, it is an attractive bird food plant. [6] The plant was introduced into cultivation in California by Theodore Payne.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Center for Plant Conservation Profile
  2. ^ Flora of North America vol 3.
  3. ^ Loconte, H., & J. R. Estes. 1989. Phylogenetic systematics of Berberidaceae and Ranunculales (Magnoliidae). Systematic Botany 14:565-579.
  4. ^ Marroquín, Jorge S., & Joseph E. Laferrière. 1997. Transfer of specific and infraspecific taxa from Mahonia to Berberis. Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science 30(1):53-55.
  5. ^ Laferrière, Joseph E. 1997. Transfer of specific and infraspecific taxa from Mahonia to Berberis. Bot. Zhurn. 82(9):96-99.
  6. ^ a b c d e California Natives Wiki: Berberis neviniiTheodore Payne Foundation . accessed 7.8.2012.
  7. ^ a b c The Nature Conservancy
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Notes

Comments

Berberis nevinii is known from scattered populations from San Francisquito Canyon, north of Valencia, south to Dripping Springs, near Aguanga. It is susceptible to infection by Puccinia graminis .
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: USFWS tracks as Berberis nevinii (2/96).

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Synonyms

Mahonia nevinii A. Grey [2,4]

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The scientific name of Nevin's barberry is Berberis nevinii A. Grey (Berberidaceae) [4,13].

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Common Names

Nevin's barberry

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