Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Central WA, ID, and w. MT, south to CA and UT. Peripheral.

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials or subshrubs, 15–70 cm (caudices woody, rhizomatous). Stems (green or purple) erect or ascending, puberulent. Leaves opposite proximally, alternate on distal 1/4–1/2 of stems; petioles 5–12 mm; blades triangular to ovate, 2.5–5 × 1.7–4 cm, bases truncate to cuneate, margins serrate, apices acute, abaxial faces gland-dotted. Heads clustered. Peduncles 2–5 mm, minutely puberulent. Involucres 3–3.5(–4) mm. Phyllaries: apices acute, abaxial faces viscid-puberulent and/or sessile-glandular. Corollas pink, bluish, or white tinged with purple, lobes glabrous or glabrate. Cypselae sessile-glandular. 2n = 34.
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Diagnostic Description

This species could be confused with BRICKELLIA GRANDIFLORA or SAUSSUREA AMERICANA, but both of these have involucral bracts in many rows of different lengths.

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Synonym

Eupatorium occidentale Hooker, Fl. Bor.-Amer. 1: 305. 1833
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Type Information

Isotype for Eupatorium occidentale var. decemplex A. Nelson
Catalog Number: US 542436
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): J. F. Macbride
Year Collected: 1910
Locality: Fall Creek, Elmore County., Elmore, Idaho, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 1372
  • Isotype: Nelson, A. 1912. Bot. Gaz. 53 (3): 226.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Wikipedia

Ageratina occidentalis

Ageratina occidentalis is a species of flowering plant in the daisy family known by the common name western snakeroot or western eupatorium. It is native to the western United States where it grows in several types of habitat. This is a rhizomatous perennial herb growing fuzzy green or purple stems to a maximum height near 70 centimeters. The glandular leaves are triangular in shape with serrated edges. The inflorescence is a dense cluster of fuzzy flower heads containing long, protruding disc florets in shades of white, pink, and blue. There are no ray florets. The fruit is an achene a few millimeters long with a rough, bristly pappus.

Uses[edit]

Among the Zuni people, this plant is used as an ingredient of "schumaakwe cakes" and used externally for rheumatism and swelling. [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stevenson, Matilda Coxe 1915 Ethnobotany of the Zuni Indians. SI-BAE Annual Report #30 (p. 50)
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Notes

Comments

Ageratina occidentalis is the only species of the genus in the flora area with sessile-glandular cypselae; peduncles also may be sessile-glandular. Its identity also can be confirmed among flora area species by its relatively long (5–6 mm) corollas.
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