Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

This native perennial plant is 2-3½' tall. Sometimes it is slender and little branched, while at other times it branches frequently, creating a bushy appearance. The slender stems usually have lines of fine white hairs. The alternate leaves are linear and have smooth margins. The larger leaves have 3 conspicuous veins, although the smaller ones usually have only a single conspicuous vein. They are up to 4" long and 3/8" across, or slightly wider. Sometimes there are a few white hairs near the base of the leaves and along the central vein on the underside. There are clusters of small composite flowers at the apex of the plant and many of the upper side stems. These flower clusters are usually rather flat-headed, but they sometimes assume a round-headed appearance. Each composite flower is yellow, consisting of about 21-35 disk florets and ray florets (when considered together). It is only about 1/8" across – smaller than the composite flowers of other goldenrods.  These compound flowers often bloom gradually, rather than simultaneously, with older flowers turning brown while younger flowers are still in the bud stage. The blooming period is late summer to early fall, and lasts about 1 month. Sometimes there is a mild floral scent. The root system is fibrous, and new plants develop vegetatively from rhizomes. Overall, Grass-Leaved Goldenrod is rather variable across different localities.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments

Grass-Leaved Goldenrod has more slender leaves than other goldenrods in Illinois, except for Euthamia gymnospermoides (Plains Grass-Leaved Goldenrod). However, there is only a single conspicuous vein in the largest leaves of this latter species, its stems are hairless, it has only 12-20 disk and ray florets in a compound flower (when considered together), and it is usually more branched and bushy in appearance. Grass-Leaved Goldenrod also differs from the latter species by preferring more soggy habitats. Return
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Euthamia graminifolia var. major (Michx.) Moldenke:
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Euthamia graminifolia var. graminifolia :
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Solidago microcephala (Greene) Bush:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Solidago graminifolia var. polycephala (Fernald) Fernald:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Solidago tenuifolia var. pycnocephala Fernald:
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Solidago tenuifolia var. tenuifolia :
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Solidago graminifolia var. nuttallii (Greene) Fernald:
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Solidago graminifolia var. graminifolia :
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Solidago graminifolia var. major (Michx.) Fernald:
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Solidago nuttallii (Greene) Bush:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Solidago × hirtipes Fernald:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Euthamia remota Greene:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Euthamia minor (Michx.) Greene:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Euthamia galetorum Greene:
China (Asia)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Solidago graminifolia (L.) Salisb.:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Euthamia graminifolia (L.) Nutt.:
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 30–150 cm. Stems (commonly branched in distal 1 / 4 ) glabrous or densely spreading-hirtellous, not glaucous. Leaves spreading to ascending; blades 3- or 5-nerved, linear to lanceolate, 37–130 × (2.1–)3–12 mm, lengths 7–20 times widths, abruptly to gradually reduced distally, herbaceous to firm-herbaceous, margins scabro-ciliate, apices obtuse to acuminate, faces usually little and obscurely gland-dotted (26–47 dots per mm²), barely viscid (more so on exposed shores), glabrous or densely spreading-hirtellous. Heads glomerulate, usually in flat-topped arrays (1.5–28 cm diam.), 10–28% of plant heights (branches unequal, giving irregular, broken appearance). Involucres broadly campanulate to campanulate, 3–5.3 mm. Phyllaries often ± yellow basally, outer (at least) usually green-tipped, outer ovate, inner oblong, apices obtuse or broadly acute. Ray florets (7–)17–22(–35). Disc florets (3–)5–7(–13); corollas 2.6–3.4 mm. 2n = 18.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Chrysocoma graminifolia Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 841. 1753 ; Euthamia fastigiata Bush; E. floribunda Greene; E. graminifolia var. major (Michaux) Moldenke; E. graminifolia var. nuttallii (Greene) Sieren; E. hirtipes (Fernald) Sieren; Solidago camporum Greene var. tricostata Lunell; S. graminifolia (Linnaeus) Salisbury var. major (Michaux) Fernald; S. graminifolia var. septentrionalis Fernald; S. hirtipes Fernald; S. lanceolata Linnaeus
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Type Information

Holotype for Euthamia microcephala Greene
Catalog Number: US 384924
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): R. M. Harper
Year Collected: 1900
Locality: Leslie., Sumter, Georgia, United States, North America
  • Holotype: Greene, E. L. 1902. Pittonia. 5: 79.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Syntype for Euthamia microphylla Greene
Catalog Number: US 340888
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): S. M. Tracy
Year Collected: 1898
Locality: Ocean Springs., Jackson, Mississippi, United States, North America
  • Syntype: Greene, E. L. 1902. Pittonia. 5: 79.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Isotype for Solidago hirtipes Fernald
Catalog Number: US 1971626
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): M. L. Fernald & B. H. Long
Year Collected: 1945
Locality: Waverly., Sussex, Virginia, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Fernald, M. L. 1946. Rhodora. 48: 65.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Isotype for Solidago tenuifolia var. pycnocephala Fernald
Catalog Number: US 1104356
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): M. L. Fernald, C. Bissell, C. Graves, B. H. Long & D. Linden
Year Collected: 1920
Locality: Salmon Lake., Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada, North America
  • Isotype: Fernald, M. L. 1922. Rhodora. 23: 293.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Isotype for Euthamia fastigiata Bush
Catalog Number: US 332473
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of original publication
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): ex herb. Biltmore
Year Collected: 1897
Locality: Biltmore., Buncombe, North Carolina, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Bush, B. F. 1918. Amer. Midl. Naturalist. 5: 164.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Isotype for Solidago graminifolia var. septentrionalis Fernald
Catalog Number: US 893365
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): M. L. Fernald & K. M. Wiegand
Year Collected: 1911
Locality: Grand Falls, Exploits River., Newfoundland, Canada, North America
  • Isotype: Fernald, M. L. 1915. Rhodora. 17: 12.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Holotype for Euthamia floribunda Greene
Catalog Number: US 46915
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): J. Holmes
Year Collected: 1890
Locality: Porte Norris., Cumberland, New Jersey, United States, North America
  • Holotype: Greene, E. L. 1902. Pittonia. 5: 74.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Grass-Leaved Goldenrod in Illinois

Euthamia graminifolia (Grass-Leaved Goldenrod)
(Also referred to as Solidago graminifolia; bees collect pollen or suck nectar; flies and beetles feed on pollen or suck nectar; other insects suck nectar; observations are from Robertson, Graenicher, Moure & Hurd, and Swengel & Swengel as indicated below)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn cp fq (Rb, Gr); Apidae (Bombini): Bombus fraternus sn (Rb), Bombus griseocallis sn (Rb, Gr), Bombus impatiens sn cp fq (Rb), Bombus pensylvanica sn fq (Rb, Gr), Bombus vagans sn cp (Gr), Psithyrus citrinus sn (Gr), Psithyrus variabilis sn (Gr); Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Melissodes agilis sn (Gr), Melissodes boltoniae sn cp (Rb), Melissodes nivea sn cp (Rb), Melissodes rustica sn cp (Gr); Anthophoridae (Xylocopini): Xylocopa virginica sn cp (Gr); Megachilidae (Coelioxini): Coelioxys modesta sn (Gr), Coelioxys moesta sn (Gr); Megachilidae (Megachilini): Megachile addenda sn (Gr), Megachile centuncularis sn (Gr), Megachile mendica sn (Gr)

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Agapostemon sericea sn (Gr), Augochlorella striata sn (Gr), Halictus confusus sn cp (Gr), Halictus ligatus sn cp (Rb), Halictus rubicunda sn (Gr), Halictus sp. (Lasioglossum sp.) sn (Gr), Lasioglossum sp. (Gr), Lasioglossum coriaceus sn (Gr), Lasioglossum cressonii sn (Gr), Lasioglossum imitatus sn cp (Gr), Lasioglossum versatus sn cp (Rb), Lasioglossum vierecki (MH); Halictidae (Sphecodini): Sphecodes dichroa sn (Gr); Colletidae (Colletinae): Colletes simulans armata sn cp olg (Rb, Kr); Colletidae (Hylaeinae): Hylaeus affinis sn (Gr), Hylaeus mesillae sn (Gr); Andrenidae (Andreninae): Andrena asteris sn cp (Gr), Andrena canadensis sn cp (Gr), Andrena hirticincta sn cp olg (Gr), Andrena nubecula sn cp olg (Gr), Andrena simplex sn cp olg (Rb, Kr)

Wasps
Sphecidae (Bembicinae): Bembix americana (Gr), Bembix nubilipennis (Rb), Bicyrtes ventralis (Gr), Stizus brevipennis (Rb); Sphecidae (Crabroninae): Ectemnius continuus (Rb), Ectemnius decemmaculatus (Rb, Gr), Ectemnius rufifemur (Gr); Sphecidae (Larrinae): Ancistromma distincta (Rb), Tachysphex pompiliformis (Gr); Sphecidae (Philanthinae): Cerceris clypeata (Gr), Eucerceris zonata (Rb), Philanthus solivagus (Gr), Philanthus ventilabris (Gr); Sphecidae (Sphecinae): Prionyx atrata (Rb), Sphex ichneumonea (Gr); Scoliidae: Scolia bicincta (Rb); Tiphiidae: Myzinum quinquecincta (Rb, Gr); Sapygidae: Sapyga interrupta (Gr); Vespidae: Dolichovespula arenaria (Gr), Dolichovespula maculata (Gr), Polistes fuscata (Rb, Gr); Vespidae (Eumeninae): Ancistrocerus adiabatus (Rb, Gr), Ancistrocerus antilope (Rb, Gr) fq, Ancistrocerus catskill (Rb, Gr), Parancistrocerus pedestris (Gr); Pompilidae: Anoplius marginatus (Gr), Entypus fulvicornis (Rb)

Flies
Syrphidae: Allograpta obliqua (Gr), Eristalinus aeneus (Gr), Eristalis anthophorina (Gr), Eristalis dimidiatus (Gr), Eristalis flavipes (Gr), Eristalis transversus (Gr), Helophilus fasciatus fq (Gr), Helophilus latifrons (Gr), Paragus tibialis (Gr), Sphaerophoria contiqua sn (Rb), Spilomyia sayi sn (Rb, Gr), Syritta pipiens (Gr), Toxomerus geminatus (Gr), Toxomerus marginatus (Gr), Toxomerus politus (Gr), Tropidia quadrata (Gr); Conopidae: Thecophora occidensis (Gr); Bombyliidae: Poecilanthrax halcyon (Gr), Sparnopolius confusus (Gr); Tachinidae: Archytas analis (Gr), Gymnoclytia occidua sn (Rb), Opsidia gonioides (Gr), Paradidyma singularis sn (Rb), Tachinomyia panaetius (Gr); Anthomyiidae: Delia platura (Gr); Calliphoridae: Bellardia sp. (Gr), Calliphora vicina (Gr), Cochliomyia macellaria sn (Rb, Gr), Lucilia sp. (Gr), Lucilia illustris (Gr), Lucilia sericata (Gr), Pollenia rudis (Gr); Muscidae: Graphomya maculata (Gr), Morellia micans (Gr), Musca domestica (Gr), Myospila meditabunda (Gr), Neomyia cornicina sn (Rb, Gr), Stomoxys calcitrans (Gr); Sarcophagidae: Helicobia rapax (Gr), Sarcophaga spp. (Gr), Sarcophaga sarracenioides (Gr), Senotainia rubriventris sn (Rb), Sphixapata trilineata (Gr); Culicidae: Aedes vexans sn (Gr); Lauxaniidae: Minettia lupulina (Gr); Scathophagidae: Scathophaga furcata (Gr)

Butterflies
Nymphalidae: Boloria selene myrina (Gr), Danaus plexippus (Gr), Limenitis archippus (Gr), Limenitis arthemis astyanax (Gr), Nymphalis antiopa (Gr), Phyciodes tharos (Rb), Speyeria idalia (Gr), Vanessa atalanta (Gr), Vanessa cardui (Gr), Vanessa virginiensis (Rb, Gr); Lycaenidae: Everes comyntas (Rb), Lycaeides melissa samuelis (Sw), Lycaena hyllus (Rb, Gr), Satyrium sp. (Gr); Pieridae: Colias philodice (Rb, Gr), Pieris rapae (Gr)

Skippers
Hesperiidae: Epargyreus clarus (Rb), Polites peckius (Rb), Polites themistocles (Rb)

Moths
Arctiidae: Utetheisa bella (Rb, Gr); Crambidae: Crambus laqueatellus (Rb, Gr); Noctuidae: Anagrapha falcifera (Gr), Caenurgina erechtea (Gr), Feltia jaculifera (Gr), Helicoverpa zea (Rb, Gr), Mythimna unipuncta (Gr); Pyralidae: Nomophila nearctica (Rb); Sesiidae: Cisseps fulvicollis (Gr);

Beetles
Cantharidae: Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus sn fq (Rb, H); Cerambycidae: Megacyllene robiniae (Gr); Chrysomelidae: Diabrotica undecimpunctata (Gr); Cleridae: Trichodes apivorus (Gr); Meloidae: Epicauta pensylvanica sn fq (Rb)

Plant Bugs
Lygaeidae: Neacoryphus bicrucis (Gr); Miridae: Adelphocoris rapidus (Gr), Lygus lineolaris (Gr); Pentatomidae: Cosmopepla lintneriana (Gr), Euschistus tristigma (Gr), Euschistus variolaria (Gr); Thyreocoridae: Corimelaena pulicarius (Gr), Galgupha atra (Gr)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Faunal Associations

The small flowers attract many kinds of insects, including long-tongued bees, short-tongued bees, wasps, flies, butterflies, moths, and beetles. Various wasps and a few beetle species, such as Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus (Goldenrod Soldier Beetle) and Epicauta pensylvanica (Black Blister Beetle), seem to be especially attracted to the flowers. The caterpillars of several species of moths eat various parts of this and other goldenrods (see Moth Table). The seeds are eaten by the Eastern Goldfinch and Swamp Sparrow to a limited extent, while the foliage is occasionally consumed in limited amounts by the Greater Prairie Chicken, Cottontail Rabbit, and White-Tailed Deer. Photographic Location
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
Golovinomyces orontii parasitises live Solidago graminifolia

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Euthamia graminifolia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 11
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Euthamia caroliniana

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: TNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Euthamia galetorum is found scattered on sandy to gravelly beaches of lakes and in damp thickets in southern Nova Scotia. It is also reported to occur in Maine, Massachussets, New York, and New Hampshire, where its available habitat would be limited.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Comments: "Human activities are probably the greatest threat to the Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora. There are negative impacts from activities such as all-terrain vehicle use, shoreline enhancement (dock building, beach clearing), peat mining, cranberry production, drainage of land for agriculture and development. Hydro-electric dams eliminate natural fluctuations in water levels. Logging operations, agriculture, and waterfront residence can cause runoff which increases nutrient levels negatively affecting the flora" (Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora Conservation and Recovery Team 2001). Euthamia galetorum is considered particularly sensitive to human activities or natural events due to its limited distribution (Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora Conservation and Recovery Team 2001). In addition, "[Atlantic Coastal Plain] plants are small, slow-growing, and adapted to living in areas where many other plants cannot survive. The conditions where they grow are low in nutrients, and subject to disturbance by wind, waves, and changing water levels. They do not compete well with other more aggressive plants and therefore can not establish in undisturbed, fertile areas (Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora Conservation and Recovery Team 2001).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

These species are introduced in Switzerland.
  • Aeschimann, D. & C. Heitz. 2005. Synonymie-Index der Schweizer Flora und der angrenzenden Gebiete (SISF). 2te Auflage. Documenta Floristicae Helvetiae N° 2. Genève.   http://www.crsf.ch/ External link.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Info Flora (CRSF/ZDSF) & Autoren 2005

Supplier: Name It's Source (profile not public)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full sun and moist conditions. However, this plant tolerates drier conditions, and can be surprisingly drought tolerant. The soil should contain high amounts of organic matter; some varieties of this plant also grow in moist sandy soil. Powdery mildew seems to bother this goldenrod less often than many others. It is easy to grow, but can spread aggressively in moist sunny places. Range & Habitat
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Euthamia graminifolia

Euthamia graminifolia (grass-leaved goldenrod) is a plant in the daisy family, Asteraceae.[1]

It is native to much of North America, and also has introduced populations in Europe and Asia.[1]

Description[edit]

Euthamia graminifolia is a herbaceous plant with alternate, simple leaves, on thin, branching stems. The flowers are yellow, borne in summer through fall.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2. Euthamia graminifolia (Linnaeus) Nuttall", Flora of North America 


Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Plants with densely hairy leaves and stems have been called var. nuttallii. Though extremes are distinct, the plants cannot be reliably separated rangewide from typical Euthamia graminifolia. Plants called var. major have been distinguished primarily on the basis of leaf dimensions (lengths 8–11 times widths in var. major versus 11–20 in typical E. graminifolia). Overlap is extensive; no discrete boundaries can be drawn.

Euthamia hirtipes was described as a putative hybrid involving a hairy E. graminifolia and a small-headed E. caroliniana (M. L. Fernald 1946d). It combines broad, hairy leaf blades with few-flowered heads, a condition that is not intermediate between the putative parents. D. J. Sieren and J. F. Merrit (1980) and C. E. Taylor (1975) reviewed the plants. Until evidence can be supplied to the contrary, E. hirtipes should be considered a synonym of E. graminifolia.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Has been treated as a species, Euthamia (or Solidago) galetorum, as in Kartesz (1999) and in 'Rare Plants of Canada' (Argus & Pryer); has also been treated at the varietal level as Euthamia tenuifolia var. pycnocephala (as in Kartesz, 1994).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!