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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Dioecious. Plants 0.5–4 cm. Stolons none. Basal leaves: 1-nerved, linear to narrowly spatulate, 8–11 × 1–1.2 mm, tips acute, faces ± gray-tomentose. Cauline leaves linear or oblanceolate, 7–12 mm, not flagged (apices acute). Heads borne singly. Involucres: staminate 6–8 mm; pistillate 10–11 mm. Phyllaries distally dingy brown (apices acute-acuminate). Corollas: staminate 3–5 mm; pistillate 8–10 mm. Cypselae 2–3.5 mm, pubescent; pappi: staminate 4.5–6 mm; pistillate 10–12 mm. 2n = 28, 56.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Gnaphalium dimorphum Nuttall, Trans. Amer. Philos. Soc., n. s. 7: 405. 1841; Antennaria dimorpha var. integra L. F. Henderson; A. dimorpha var. macrocephala D. C. Eaton; A. dimorpha var. nuttallii D. C. Eaton; A. latisquama Piper; A. macrocephala (D. C. Eaton) Rydberg
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Type Information

Type collection for Antennaria dimorpha var. integra L.F. Hend.
Catalog Number: US 231698
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): L. F. Henderson
Year Collected: 1895
Locality: Long Valley., Idaho, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 1250 to 1250
  • Type collection: Henderson, L. F. 1900. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club. 27: 347.
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Isotype for Antennaria dimorpha var. macrocephala D.C. Eaton in C. King
Catalog Number: US 42709
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): S. Watson
Year Collected: 1869
Locality: Salt Lake City., Utah, United States, North America
  • Isotype: King, C. 1871. Rep. U.S. Geol. Explor. Fortieth Par., Bot. 5: 186.
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Isotype for Antennaria dimorpha var. nuttallii D.C. Eaton in C. King
Catalog Number: US 82412
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): S. Watson
Year Collected: 1868
Locality: Carson City., Ormsby, Nevada, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 1524 to 1524
  • Isotype: King, C. 1871. Rep. U.S. Geol. Explor. Fortieth Par., Bot. 5: 186.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Antennaria dimorpha

Antennaria dimorpha is a species of flowering plant in the daisy family known by the common name low pussytoes. It is native to western North America from British Columbia to California to Nebraska, where it is generally found in dry areas. This is a small mat-forming perennial herb growing in a flat patch from a thick, branching caudex. The spoon-shaped leaves are up to about a centimeter long and green but coated with long, gray hairs. The erect inflorescences are only a few centimeters tall. Each holds a single flower head lined with dark brown and green patched phyllaries. It is dioecious, with male plants bearing heads of staminate flowers and female plants bearing heads of larger pistillate flowers. The fruit is an achene with a long, soft, barbed pappus.

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Notes

Comments

Antennaria dimorpha is characterized by narrowly oblanceolate leaves and relatively large heads (borne singly). It is, perhaps, the most xerophytic of spring-blooming Antennaria species. It belongs to the Dimorphae group.
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