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Overview

Brief Summary

This rare plant is also called pussy toes! From a distance, you can tell by the color if you are looking at male or female plants. Males are white and females are pinkish. Cat's foot has runners just like strawberries, so that one-sexed colonies often form. However, unless the plants are pollinated, no seed develops. This can be the reason why cat's foot has become so rare. If the one-sexed colonies are too far apart, the insects that spread the pollen won't deposit it where it's needed. And if the habitat of a colony is destroyed, there is no seed to restore it.
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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Dioecious. Plants 3–10 cm. Stolons 2–5 cm. Basal leaves 1-nerved, spatulate or rhombic-spatulate, 3–18 × 3–6 mm, tips mucronate, abaxial faces gray-tomentose, adaxial green-glabrous. Cauline leaves linear, 7–13 mm, not flagged (apices acute). Heads 3–7 in corymbiform arrays. Involucres: staminate 5–6.5 mm; pistillate 5–7 mm. Phyllaries distally dark pink to light pink or white. Corollas: staminate 3–4 mm; pistillate 4–5 mm. Cypselae 0.5–1 mm, papillate; pappi: staminate 3.5–4.5 mm; pistillate 5–6 mm. 2n = 28.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Gnaphalium dioicum Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 850. 1753; Antennaria hyperborea D. Don; A. insularis Greene
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Type Information

Holotype for Antennaria insularis Greene
Catalog Number: US 424431
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of alleged type specimen
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): M. A. Baker
Year Collected: 1873
Locality: Kiska Island, Alaska, United States, North America
  • Holotype: Greene, E. L. 1898. Pittonia. 3: 276.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Antennaria dioica

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Antennaria dioica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 10
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Antennaria dioica

Antennaria dioica (Mountain Everlasting, Catsfoot, Cudweed or Stoloniferous Pussytoes) is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae. It is found in cool temperate regions of Europe and Asia, and also in North America in Alaska only.

Antennaria dioica

It is a herbaceous perennial plant growing to 10–20 cm tall, with a rosette of basal spoon-shaped leaves 4 cm long, and 1 cm broad at their broadest near the apex; and smaller leaves arranged spirally up the flowering stems. The flowers are produced in capitulae (flowerheads) 6–12 mm diameter with pale pink ray florets and darker pink disc florets.

It is dioecious, but can also reproduce without fertilisation. It is found in groups which can be all-female colonies, all-male colonies, and also mixed colonies. The male plants have whiter flowerheads than female plants.

References[edit]

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Notes

Comments

Antennaria dioica ranges from the British Isles to Japan and into the Aleutian Islands (R. J. Bayer 2000). It is characterized by glabrous adaxial leaf faces and distally pink or white phyllaries. The circumscription of A. dioica in North America has long been debated; A. marginata of southwestern states bears a remarkable similarity to A. dioica. DNA sequence data (Bayer et al. 1996) indicate that the two taxa are not sisters; they are only distantly related. They are allopatric. Antennaria dioica may be a sexual progenitor of the A. parvifolia complex.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Note from Rob Lipkin (AKHP): widespread eurasian taxon (94-03-24).

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