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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Gynoecious (staminate plants uncommon). Plants 4–30 cm. Stolons 1–7 cm. Basal leaves 1-nerved, 8–40 × 2–10 mm, spatulate, oblanceolate, or cuneate, tips mucronate, faces usually gray-pubescent, adaxial sometimes green-glabrous. Cauline leaves linear, 6–36 mm, usually not flagged (apices acute to subulate or with lanceolate flags). Heads 3–20 in corymbiform arrays. Involucres: staminate unknown; pistillate 4–10 mm. Phyllaries distally brown, cream, gray, green, pink, red, white, or yellow (apices acute or erose-obtuse). Corollas: staminate unknown; pistillate 2.5–6 mm. Cypselae 0.7–1.8 mm, glabrous or papillate; pappi: staminate unknown; pistillate 3.5–6.5 mm. 2n = 42, 56, (70).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Antennaria rosea

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Antennaria rosea

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 10
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Antennaria rosea

Antennaria rosea is a species of flowering plant in the daisy family known by the common name rosy pussytoes. It is native to much of North America, including most of Canada and the western United States. It is a plant of many habitats, from dry to wet climates and low elevation to very high. It is a very morphologically diverse species; individuals can look very different. It is polyploid and exhibits apomixis; most all the plants are female and they reproduce asexually.[1] This is a perennial herb which grows to heights anywhere between about 10 and 40 centimeters. It has a network of short stolons by which it spreads, its method of vegetative reproduction. It forms a basal patch of woolly grayish leaves 1 to 4 centimeters long. The inflorescence contains several flower heads in a cluster. Each head is lined with wide, pointed phyllaries which are often rose in color, the trait that gives the species its name, but they may also be white, yellowish, or brownish. The species is dioecious, but since most of the individuals are female, most bear flower heads containing pistillate flowers. The fruit is an achene with a body less than 2 millimeters long and a pappus which may be 6 or 7 millimeters long. The plant often produces fertile seeds, but most individuals in most populations are clones.[2] Plants are sometimes fertilized with pollen from other Antennaria species, which may bring new genes into an A. rosea population, increasing the genetic diversity amongst the clones.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bayer, R. J. (1989). A taxonomic revision of the Antennaria rosea (Asteraceae: Inuleae: Gnaphaliinae) polyploid complex. Brittonia 41:1 53-60.
  2. ^ a b Bayer, R. J. (1990) Patterns of clonal diversity in the Antennaria rosea (Asteraceae) polyploid agamic complex. American Journal of Botany 77:10 1313-19.
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Notes

Comments

Antennaria rosea is the most widespread Antennaria of North America, occurring in dry to moist habitats from near sea level to the alpine zone. The A. rosea polyploid agamic complex is one of the more morphologically diverse complexes of North American Antennaria. It occurs from the western cordillera of North America from southern California, Arizona, and New Mexico north to subarctic Alaska and east to Greenland and, disjunctly, in the Canadian maritime provinces, eastern Quebec, and immediately north of and adjacent to Lake Superior (R. J. Bayer et al. 1991). Antennaria chilensis (including A. chilensis var. magellanica) is a Patagonian endemic that morphologically fits within the circumscription of A. rosea and may well be an amphitropical disjunct member of the complex.

Antennaria rosea is taxonomically confusing; it includes agamospermous microspecies that have been recognized as distinct taxonomic species. Morphometric and isozyme analyses have demonstrated that the primary source of morphologic variability in the complex derives from six sexually reproducing progenitors, A. aromatica, A. corymbosa, A. pulchella, A. microphylla, A. racemosa, and A. umbrinella (R. J. Bayer 1989b, 1990b, 1990c). Additionally, three other sexually reproducing species, A. marginata, A. suffrutescens, and A. rosulata, may have contributed to the genetic complexity of the A. rosea complex (Bayer 1990b). Here, four reasonably distinct subspecies are recognized within the complex.

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