Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Range Description

Centaurea gymnocarpa is endemic to the Italian island of Capraia, a small island which is part of the Tuscan Archipelago.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is a herbaceous species that colonizes cracks and fissures of rock faces, growing on acid rocks. It is found in association with Linaria capraia and other endemic species such as Silene badaroi and Galium caprarium.

C. gymnocarpa belongs to the group known as the "cineraria" group. This group probably was once a single species when the land masses were united, but as islands were formed, new species evolved on each island. This means that today there are a number of closely related species of Centaurea in the Mediterranean growing on rocky seaward cliffs, all probably related to a common ancestor.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
D

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2006

Assessor/s
Foggi, B.

Reviewer/s
Strahm, W. & de Montmollin, B. (Mediterranean Island Plants Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
The population size is estimated to be less than 250 individuals. The decline in this small population is not yet significant enough to classify this species as Critically Endangered, as only one subpopulation, of 20 individuals, is under threat.
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Population

Population
The population size is estimated to be less than 250 individuals. Eight subpopulations have been identified. The one threatened subpopulation is composed of less than 20 individuals, while the seven others include more then 20 individuals.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
The subpopulation, situated between Paese and Porto, is severely threatened by competition from two invasive plants: Carpobrotus acinaciformis and Senecio angulatus. These two species in the last years have been expanding in Capraia, but do not yet grow in the other areas where C. gymnocarpa occurs, which are for the most part far away from areas of human habitation.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Actions in Place
Legally: This species is protected by the law 56/2000, which is a law guiding biodiversity conservation in the Tuscan region, and is quite similar to the EC Habitats Directive. Under this law, it is forbidden to collect any species in this genus.

In situ: Four of the eight known subpopulations occur in the Tuscan Archipelago National Park. The Park includes a protected terrestrial area of just under 18,000 ha, and a marine protected area of approximately 60,000 ha (making it the largest European marine park). The objective of the Tuscan Archipelago National Park is to protect this fragile natural environment, which is very rich in cultural and scientific values.

Ex situ: The species is cultivated in the Botanical Garden of Florence.

Actions Needed
Monitoring of all subpopulations is needed, and a programme to remove invasive alien plants which threaten one of the subpopulations needs to be undertaken. Efforts to ensure that these alien species do not start growing in the other areas where this species is found are also very important. Once the alien species have been eradicated, a re-introduction programme will be planned, using specimens propagated from the threatened population.
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Wikipedia

Centaurea cineraria

Centaurea cineraria, the Velvet Centaurea, is – like some other plants – also known as "dusty miller". It is a small plant in the family Asteraceae and originates from the Island of Capraia in Italy, where it is called fiordaliso delle scogliere.[3]

The mature plants will grow from 15 cm to 60 cm (6inches to 24 inches). They prefer full sun, but will tolerate light shade, and also prefers average to rich well-drained soil.

C. cineraria will produce small white or yellow flowers in summer, but these are usually trimmed because the plant is normally grown as foliage.

Depending on climate, it can be grown as either an annual or as a perennial.

Common varieties include: "Silver Dust", "Silver Lace" and "Cirrus". The image above the scientific classification is a plant of the "Silver Lace" variety.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Euro+Med Plantbase lists Centaurea gymnocarpa as an accepted species, while the Global Compositae Checklist lists it as a synonym of Centaurea cinerea. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, Version 2014.1, states "C. gymnocarpa belongs to the ... "cineraria" group ... probably was once a single species, ... but as islands were formed, new species evolved on each island."
  2. ^ Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN) (1992-05-20). "Taxon: Centaurea cineraria L." (HTML). Taxonomy for Plants. USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program, National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland. Retrieved 2008-03-03. 
  3. ^ a b Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem. "Details for: Centaurea cineraria" (HTML). Euro+Med PlantBase. Freie Universität Berlin. Retrieved 2008-03-03. 
  • Ellis, Barbara W., "Taylor's Guide to Annuals, How to Select and Grow More Than 400 Annuals, Bienniels, and Tender Perenniels", 1999 Haughton Mifflin Company, New York, NY
  • Armitage, Allan M., "Armitage's Manual of Annuals, Bienniels, and Half Hardy Perenniels", illustrated Asha Kays and Chris Johnson, 2001 Timber Press Inc., Singapore
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Centaurea gymnocarpa

Centaurea gymnocarpa is a species of flowering plant in the Asteraceae family. It is endemic to Italy. Its natural habitats are Mediterranean-type shrubby vegetation and rocky areas. While it is an endangered species in the wild, it is sometimes used in gardens as an ornamental plant.

Source

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