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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 25–80 cm, from rhizomes or stolons. Stems 1–several, erect, simple or sparingly branched, villous with septate hairs and thinly arachnoid-tomentose with long, simple hairs. Leaves thinly villous and ± tomentose, glabrate; proximal leaves winged-petiolate, blades 10–30 cm, margins entire or remotely dentate to pinnately lobed; mid and distal leaves sessile, blades decurrent, ovate to oblong or lanceolate, entire or remotely denticulate. Heads radiant, borne singly or in few-headed corymbiform arrays; (peduncles to 7 cm). Involucres ovoid to ± campanulate, 20–25 mm. Principal phyllaries: bodies greenish, ovate to lanceolate, scarious-margined, appendages appressed, brown to black, unarmed, decurrent on phyllary margins, pectinate-fringed, puberulent; innermost phyllaries sometimes unappendaged. Florets 35–60+; sterile florets 10–20, corollas blue (white, purple, or pink), 2.5–4.5 cm, corolla tube elongate. Disc florets 25–40+; corollas purple, ca. 20 mm; anthers dark blue-purple. Cypselae ± brown, 5–6 mm, sericeous; pappi of bristles 0.5–1.5 mm. 2n = 24 (Germany), 40 (Russia), 44 (France).
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Chaetostomella cylindrica feeds within capitulum of Centaurea montana

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
Erysiphe depressa parasitises live Centaurea montana

Foodplant / parasite
Golovinomyces cichoracearum parasitises live Centaurea montana

Foodplant / spot causer
usually hypophyllous colony of Ramularia hyphomycetous anamorph of Ramularia triboutiana causes spots on live leaf of Centaurea montana

Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Trupanea stellata feeds within capitulum of Centaurea montana
Remarks: Other: uncertain

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Centaurea montana

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Centaurea montana

Centaurea montana (perennial cornflower, mountain cornflower, bachelor's button, montane knapweed or mountain bluet) is a species of Centaurea endemic to Europe. It is widespread and common in the more southerly mountain ranges of Europe, but is rarer in the north. It escapes from gardens readily, and has thereby become established in the British Isles, Scandinavia and North America.

Flower of the Centaurea montana

C. montana grows in meadows and open woodland in the upper montane and sub-alpine zones, in basic areas. It grows to 30–70 centimetres (12–28 in) tall, and flowers mainly from May to August.

C. montana may be distinguished from other Centaurea species in the region by its usually entire leaves, and the blue-purple colour of the outermost ray florets. It may be distinguished from the cornflower, C. cyanus, by having a single (rarely up to three) flower heads, and by its being perennial, whereas the cornflower has many flower heads and is annual. The closely related C. triumfettii has more narrowly winged stems, narrower leaves and grows in rockier areas.

Ornamental use [edit]

Centaurea montana grows in gardens where it grows best in sunny positions. It tolerates some light shade. Since the plant is evergreen it can use the light in winter and early spring when deciduous trees and shrubs have no leaves. It tolerates deciduous shade better than evergreen shade and prepares to flower while deciduous plant are bare. Therefore it can flower reasonably well in light deciduous shade. If the plant is dug up a new plant can eventually regenerate from small pieces of root left in the soil. Centaurea montana grows well in soils varying from light sand to heavy clay. The plant also grows well in acid, neutral or very alkaline soils. It tolerates drought but cannot tolerate waterlogged conditions.[1]

This plant is inedible; however, it is a popular medicinal plant in Central Europe.

References [edit]

  1. ^ "Centaurea montana L.". Plants for a Future. Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
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Notes

Comments

Centaurea montana is a very handsome plant, native to the mountains of Europe, now widely cultivated as an ornamental.
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