Overview

Brief Summary

Biology

Type of larval development: planktotrophic, inferred from multispiral protoconch.
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Comprehensive Description

Description

 Hinia incrassata is a small dog whelk that can grow up to 12 mm high by 6 mm wide. The shell is buff or light tan in colour, and often has brown bands at the base of the last whorl. The siphonal canal is short and deep and has a dark brown mark on its roof. The outer lip arises at a 45 degree angle to the last whorl, and in mature individuals the inner lip is toothed.
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Distribution

Eastern Atlantic, from Norway to southern Morocco, also in Canary Is. and the Azores, and throughout the Mediterranean, from shore to ca. 100 m. Gorringe, Ampère and Seine seamounts, uncommon in ca. 200 m.
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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Diagnosis

Shell up to 15 mm high with rather high spire and rounded body whorl. Protoconch small, distinctly cyrtoconoid with 2.5 smooth whorls. Teleoconch of 6-7 comvex whorls, with a sculpture of regular spiral cords, broader thn interspaces, and of axial folds which become distinctly flexuous on the body whorl. Aperture bordered externally with a strong varix forming a rim, normally unique - not repeated at earlier growth stages on the spire. Inner side of outer lip bearing ca. 10 denticles, elongated in the spiral direction. Parietal edge of aperture forming a very thin, appressed callus, with a distinct adapical denticle, continued into a thicker columellar callus with a slightly raised edge. Base of body whorl with a groove delimiting the outer part of the siphonal canal. Colour extremely variable, with distinct combinations of brown, black, yellowish or orange hues, most often with a paler band on abapical part of spire whorls and periphery of body whorls, else arranged in bands or in spiral series of blotches, or uniform. Aperture white with a highly diagnostic black blotch inside the siphonal canal.
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Ecology

Habitat

Known from seamounts and knolls
  • Stocks, K. 2009. Seamounts Online: an online information system for seamount biology. Version 2009-1. World Wide Web electronic publication.
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Depth range based on 129 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 34 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 148
  Temperature range (°C): 6.777 - 16.315
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.326 - 10.018
  Salinity (PPS): 31.839 - 38.201
  Oxygen (ml/l): 5.262 - 6.346
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.096 - 0.771
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.379 - 10.823

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 148

Temperature range (°C): 6.777 - 16.315

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.326 - 10.018

Salinity (PPS): 31.839 - 38.201

Oxygen (ml/l): 5.262 - 6.346

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.096 - 0.771

Silicate (umol/l): 1.379 - 10.823
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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 Hinia incrassata occurs from low tide level in silted areas of rocky shores and is most abundant in the shallow sublittoral and may be found at depths of up to 200 m. Hinia incrassata may be particularly abundant amongst turfs of erect Bryozoa.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Nassarius incrassatus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Nassarius incrassatus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Nassarius incrassatus

Nassarius incrassatus, common name the thick-lipped dogwhelk, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Nassariidae, the Nassa mud snails or dog whelks.[2]

Description[edit]

The shell up to 15 mm high with rather high spire and a rounded body whorl. The protoconch is small, distinctly cyrtoconoid with 2.5 smooth whorls. The teleoconch contains 6-7 convex whorls, with a sculpture of regular spiral cords, broader than the interspaces. Its axial folds become distinctly flexuous on the body whorl. The aperture is bordered externally with a strong varix forming a rim, normally unique - not repeated at the earlier growth stages on the spire. The inner side of the outer lip bears ca. 10 denticles, elongated in the spiral direction. The parietal edge of the aperture forms a very thin, appressed callus, with a distinct adapical denticle, continued into a thicker columellar callus with a slightly raised edge. The base of the body whorl has a groove delimiting the outer part of the siphonal canal.

The colour of the shell is extremely variable, with distinct combinations of brown, black, yellowish or orange hues, most often with a paler band on abapical part of spire whorls and periphery of body whorls. Elsewhere it is arranged in bands or in spiral series of blotches, or uniform. The aperture is white with a highly diagnostic black blotch inside the siphonal canal.[2]

Distribution[edit]

This species occurs in European waters, throughout the Mediterranean Sea and the Eastern Atlantic Ocean (rom Norway to southern Morocco, also in Canary Is. and the Azores) at depths between the shoreline to ca. 100 m.

References[edit]

  • Cernohorsky W. O. (1984). Systematics of the family Nassariidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda). Bulletin of the Auckland Institute and Museum 14: 1-356.
  • Backeljau, T. (1986). Lijst van de recente mariene mollusken van België [List of the recent marine molluscs of Belgium]. Koninklijk Belgisch Instituut voor Natuurwetenschappen: Brussels, Belgium. 106 pp.
  • Hayward, P.J.; Ryland, J.S. (Ed.) (1990). The marine fauna of the British Isles and North-West Europe: 1. Introduction and protozoans to arthropods. Clarendon Press: Oxford, UK. ISBN 0-19-857356-1. 627 pp
  • Gofas, S.; Le Renard, J.; Bouchet, P. (2001). Mollusca, in: Costello, M.J. et al. (Ed.) (2001). European register of marine species: a check-list of the marine species in Europe and a bibliography of guides to their identification. Collection Patrimoines Naturels, 50: pp. 180-213
  • Ávila, S.P.; Cardigos, F.; Santos, R.S. (2004). D. João de Castro Bank, a shallow water hydrothermal-vent in the Azores: checklist of marine Molluscs. Arquipélago (Ciénc. Biol. Mar./Life Mar. Sci.) 21A: 75-80
  • Muller, Y. (2004). Faune et flore du littoral du Nord, du Pas-de-Calais et de la Belgique: inventaire. [Coastal fauna and flora of the Nord, Pas-de-Calais and Belgium: inventory]. Commission Régionale de Biologie Région Nord Pas-de-Calais: France. 307 pp
  • BODC (2009). Species list from the British Oceanographic Data Centre
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