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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

Tall Coreopsis (Coreopsis tripteris) is more impressive when it occurs in loose colonies, rather than as a stand-alone specimen. Each plant has a tendency to sway with the passage of every breeze during a sunny afternoon, exerting a hypnotic effect. Tall Coreopsis can be distinguished from other Coreopsis spp. in Illinois by its greater height, later period of bloom, and flowerheads with dark purple or maroon centers. In contrast, most Coreopsis spp. have flowerheads with yellow centers. Because of its greater height, Tall Coreopsis could be confused with one of the sunflowers (Helianthus spp.), but it is readily distinguished from them by its odd-pinnate leaves. In contrast, sunflowers have simple leaves.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Description

This perennial herbaceous plant is 3-8' tall and usually unbranched, except for flowering stems along the upper one-half of its length. The central stem and more slender upper stems are light green, terete, longitudinally veined, glabrous, and sometimes glaucous. Pairs of opposite leaves occur along the entire length of the plant, although they are more common and larger in size along the lower one-half of its length. A few solitary leaves or leafy bracts may occur alternately along the uppermost stems or flowering stalks. These leaves are ascending, widely spreading, or slightly drooping. Most leaves are odd-pinnate with 3 or 5 leaflets. Individual leaflets are up to 5" long and ¾" across; they are linear-elliptic to elliptic in shape, while their margins are entire (toothless) and often short-ciliate. The bases of leaflets are wedge-shaped, while their tips are acute. The lateral leaflets are sessile, while the terminal leaflets have petiolules (basal stalklets) less than ¼" long. The upper leaf surfaces are medium green and glabrous or nearly, while the lower leaf surfaces are light green and minutely pubescent. The petioles of leaves are up to 1½" long and light green. The upper stems terminate in solitary to cyme-like clusters of flowerheads; flowering stalks also develop from the axils of upper leaves. Collectively, these flowerheads form a rather large and open compound inflorescence that is somewhat flat-headed. Peduncles of these flowerheads are up to 10" long, light green, terete, and glabrous. One or two leafy bracts may occur along the branches and peduncles of this inflorescence; these bracts are up to 1" long and linear-elliptic in shape. Each flowerhead spans about 1½–2" across, consisting of 8 sterile ray florets that surround a dense head of numerous fertile disk florets. The petaloid rays of the flowerheads are yellow, oblong-elliptic in shape, and widely spreading. The corollas of the disk florets are about 5 mm. long, tubular in shape, 4-5 lobed, and dark purple to maroon (reddish brown). The corolla lobes are triangular in shape and spreading to slightly recurved. Surrounding the base of the flowerhead, there is a single series of 8 phyllaries (inner floral bracts). These phyllaries are 6-8 mm. long, ovate in shape with recurved tips, and brownish yellow during the blooming period. Below the phyllaries, there are about 8 outer floral bracts. These bracts are linear in shape and ascending; they are joined together at a shallow cup-like base. Both the bracts and cup-like base are green and glabrous (or nearly so). The blooming period occurs from mid-summer to early autumn, lasting about 1 month for a colony of plants. There is no noticeable floral scent. Afterwards, the disk florets are replaced by achenes. These achenes are 4-5 mm. long, brown, broadly oblong or oblanceolate-oblong in shape, flattened, and narrowly winged along their lateral sides. The apices of mature achenes are truncate, lacking tufts of hairs or persistent scales (immature achenes have paired scales that are early-deciduous). The root system is fibrous and long-rhizomatous, often forming loose colonies of clonal plants. Older plants may develop small woody caudices.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Distribution

Range and Habitat in Illinois

The native Tall Coreopsis is occasional to fairly common in most counties of Illinois, but it is uncommon or absent in the NW and SE sections of the state (see Distribution Map). Habitats include black soil prairies, cemetery prairies, sand prairies, typical savannas and sandy savannas, thickets, edges of seeps, thinly wooded bluffs, meadows in wooded areas, limestone glades, abandoned fields, areas along railroads, and roadsides. Tall Coreopsis occurs in moderately disturbed to high quality habitats. It responds well to fire in areas that have been invaded by shrubby vegetation and trees. Faunal Associations
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 90–180+ cm. Inter­nodes (± mid stem) 3–7(–10+) cm. Leaves: petioles 5–45 mm; blades usually 3-foliolate, leaflets usually simple, sometimes ± pinnately lobed, ultimate blades ± lanceolate, 4–9(–12+) cm × (9–)12–35+ mm. Peduncles 2–5+ cm. Calyculi of 5–6 oblong bractlets 1.5–5 mm. Phyllaries 8, ± oblong to lance-oblong, 6–8 mm. Ray laminae 12–22+ mm. Disc florets 40–80+; corollas red-brown to purplish, 5–6 mm. Cypselae obovate to oblong, 4–5(–6) mm. 2n = 26.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Type Information

Isotype for Coreopsis tripteris var. smithii Sherff
Catalog Number: US 1394897
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): J. Donnell Smith
Year Collected: 1885
Locality: Montgomery., Alabama, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Sherff, E. E. 1929. Bot. Gaz. 88: 301.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

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Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

The native Tall Coreopsis is occasional to fairly common in most counties of Illinois, but it is uncommon or absent in the NW and SE sections of the state (see Distribution Map). Habitats include black soil prairies, cemetery prairies, sand prairies, typical savannas and sandy savannas, thickets, edges of seeps, thinly wooded bluffs, meadows in wooded areas, limestone glades, abandoned fields, areas along railroads, and roadsides. Tall Coreopsis occurs in moderately disturbed to high quality habitats. It responds well to fire in areas that have been invaded by shrubby vegetation and trees. Faunal Associations
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Tall Coreopsis in Illinois

Coreopsis tripteris (Tall Coreopsis)
(Bees collect pollen or suck nectar; flies mostly suck nectar, otherwise they feed on pollen; other insects suck nectar; most observations are from Robertson, otherwise they are from Petersen, Mitchell, Grundel & Pavlovic, and Krombein et al. as indicated below)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn cp; Apidae (Bombini): Bombus bimaculatus (Pt), Bombus fervidus (Pt), Bombus impatiens sn, Bombus pensylvanica sn fq; Anthophoridae (Ceratinini): Ceratina dupla dupla sn cp; Anthophoridae (Epeolini): Epeolus pusillus sn, Triepeolus concavus sn, Triepeolus donatus sn, Triepeolus lunatus lunatus sn; Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Melissodes agilis sn, Melissodes boltoniae (Mch), Melissodes coloradensis sn cp, Melissodes dentiventris sn, Melissodes nivea sn, Melissodes rustica sn, Melissodes trinodis sn, Svastra obliqua obliqua sn cp fq; Megachilidae (Megachilini): Megachile brevis brevis sn, Megachile melanophaea (Pt), Megachile montivaga sn, Megachile petulans sn cp fq

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Augochloropsis metallica metallica sn, Halictus ligatus sn cp fq, Halictus rubicunda (Pt), Lasioglossum coreopsis sn cp, Lasioglossum coriaceus sn, Lasioglossum pectoralis sn, Lasioglossum pilosus pilosus sn, Lasioglossum tegularis sn cp, Lasioglossum versatus sn cp; Andrenidae (Andreninae): Andrena accepta sn cp; Andrenidae (Panurginae): Calliopsis andreniformis (Kr), Calliopsis coloradensis sn cp, Heterosarus labrosiformis labrosiformis sn, Heterosarus solidaginis sn

Wasps
Sphecidae (Bembicinae): Bicyrtes ventralis; Sphecidae (Philanthinae): Philanthus gibbosus; Sphecidae (Sphecinae): Ammophila kennedyi, Ammophila nigricans, Ammophila pictipennis, Ammophila procera, Eremnophila aureonotata; Vespidae (Eumeninae): Euodynerus annulatus, Stenodynerus anormis; Scoliidae: Scolia bicincta

Flies
Syrphidae: Syritta pipiens sn, Trichopsomyia apisaon fp; Bombyliidae: Lepidophora lepidocera sn, Poeciloanthrax alcyon sn, Sparnopolius confusus sn fq, Systoechus vulgaris sn; Conopidae: Zodion obliquefasciatum sn; Tachinidae: Clausicella geniculata sn, Plagiomima spinosula sn

Butterflies
Nymphalidae: Danaus plexippus, Phyciodes tharos; Lycaenidae: Lycaeides melissa samuelis (GP)

Skippers
Hesperiidae: Polites themistocles

Beetles
Cantharidae: Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus sn

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Coreopsis tripteris

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Coreopsis tripteris

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full to partial sun and moist to mesic conditions. This plant isn't particular about soil type, and can be found growing in soil containing substantial amounts of loam, clay-loam, gravel, or sand. Tall Coreopsis tolerates competition from other plants and it is easy to grow. In moist disturbed locations, it can become aggressive. Mature plants tolerate some drought, and foliar disease is rarely a significant problem.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Wikipedia

Coreopsis tripteris

Coreopsis tripteris is a species of flowering plant in the aster family, Asteraceae. It is native to eastern North America. Its common names include tall tickseed, tall coreopsis,[1] and Atlantic coreopsis.[2]

This perennial herb usually reaches nearly a meter in height, sometimes approaching 2 meters. The leaves are mostly divided into 3 leaflets which are smooth-edged to lobed and several centimeters long. The flower heads have yellow ray florets 1 to 2 centimeters long, or longer. The center of the head has many disc florets in shades of reddish brown to purplish.[3]

This plant grows in moist habitat, such as streambanks and wet meadows. It flowers in summer.[3]

This plant is commercially available for use in cultivation as an ornamental.[4]

References[edit]

Media related to Coreopsis tripteris at Wikimedia Commons

  1. ^ Coreopsis tripteris. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN).
  2. ^ Coreopsis tripteris. Integrated Taxonomic Information System.
  3. ^ a b Coreopsis tripteris. Flora of North America.
  4. ^ Coreopsis tripteris. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. University of Texas, Austin.


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