Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

This native perennial plant is 1-3' tall and unbranched. The central stem is hairless, except for small tufts of hair at the base of the leaves.The opposite leaves are about 2-4" long. They are usually divided into 3 narrow lobes, but are sometimes linear near the inflorescence. The larger central lobe may also be divided into 1 or 2 small narrow lobes. These leaves are medium to dark green, sessile, and hairless. They are distributed evenly along the stem. The composite flowers are bright yellow and 1½-2" across. Each composite flower has numerous disk florets, which are surrounded by about 8 ray florets. The outer edges of the ray florets are less ragged in appearance than the ray florets of many other species of coreopsis. The blooming period occurs during early summer, and lasts about 3 weeks. There is no floral scent. The achenes do not have tufts of hairs. The root system is rhizomatous, and can produce dense colonies of this plant that exclude other species. During the fall, the foliage often acquires reddish tints.
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Comments

This plant has the advantage of flowering somewhat earlier during the summer than many other prairie wildflowers. It is more impressive when allowed to form dense colonies. Prairie Coreopsis can be distinguished from many other species of coreopsis by the less ragged appearance of its flowers and the characteristics of its foliage. The narrow, deeply lobed leaves are wider and less thread-like than Coreopsis grandiflora (Large-Flowered Coreopsis) and Coreopsis verticilliata (Whorled Coreopsis), which are not native to Illinois. Also, the leaves are shorter, more deeply lobed, and distributed more evenly along the stem than Coreopsis lanceolata (Lance-Leaved Coreopsis). Prairie Coreopsis is much shorter and blooms earlier than Coreopsis tripteris (Tall Coreopsis). Return
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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Range and Habitat in Illinois

Prairie Coreopsis occurs occasionally in most counties of Illinois, but is rare or absent in SE Illinois and some western counties (see Distribution Map). Habitats include mesic to dry black soil prairies, sand prairies, gravelly hill prairies, thickets, open areas of rocky upland forests, Black Oak savannas, limestone glades, and abandoned fields. It is usually found in high quality habitats because the dispersion of the seeds is rather limited.
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Coreopsis palmata Nutt.:
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 30–80 cm. Internodes (± mid stem) 25–50 mm. Leaves: petioles 0–1 mm (or 5–25+ mm, winged, and scarcely distinct from blades); blades not 3-foliolate, most with 3(–5+), ± oblong to linear lobes (5–)15–40+ × 2–3(–7+) mm (sometimes some leaves not lobed). Peduncles 1–4+ cm. Calyculi of 9–12+ oblong to lanceolate bractlets 3–9+ mm. Phyllaries 8, ± oblong to nearly orbiculate, 6–10 mm. Ray laminae 15–25+ mm. Disc florets 60–80+; corollas yellow (sometimes drying blackish), 5–6.5 mm. Cypselae oblong, 5–6 mm. 2n = 26.
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Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Prairie Coreopsis occurs occasionally in most counties of Illinois, but is rare or absent in SE Illinois and some western counties (see Distribution Map). Habitats include mesic to dry black soil prairies, sand prairies, gravelly hill prairies, thickets, open areas of rocky upland forests, Black Oak savannas, limestone glades, and abandoned fields. It is usually found in high quality habitats because the dispersion of the seeds is rather limited.
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Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Prairie Coreopsis in Illinois

Coreopsis palmata (Prairie Coreopsis)
(Bees collect pollen or suck nectar; beetles feed on pollen & are non-pollinating, or they suck nectar as indicated below; other insects suck nectar; most observations are from Robertson, otherwise they are from Moure & Hurd and Reed as indicated below)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn cp; Apidae (Bombini): Bombus pensylvanica sn; Anthophoridae (Ceratinini): Ceratina dupla dupla sn cp fq; Anthophoridae (Epeolini): Epeolus bifasciatus sn, Epeolus interruptus sn; Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Melissodes agilis sn, Melissodes boltoniae sn cp, Melissodes coreopsis sn cp fq olg, Melissodes tepaneca sn fq, Melissodes trinodis sn cp; Anthophoridae (Melectini): Xeromelecta interrupta sn; Anthophoridae (Nomadini): Nomada articulata sn, Nomada erigeronis sn, Nomada superba superba sn; Anthophoridae (Pasitidini): Holcopasites illinoiensis sn fq; Megachilidae (Anthidinini): Anthidium maculifrons sn; Megachilidae (Coelioxini): Coelioxys octodentata sn fq, Coelioxys sayi sn; Megachilidae (Megachilini): Megachile addenda sn, Megachile brevis brevis sn cp icp fq, Megachile latimanus sn, Megachile mendica sn, Megachile montivaga sn, Megachile parallela parallela sn cp, Megachile petulans, Megachile policaris sn cp, Megachile pugnatus sn cp fq, Megachile rugifrons sn; Megachilidae (Osmiinae): Ashmeadiella bucconis sn, Hoplitis pilosifrons sn, Osmia georgica sn cp; Megachilidae (Stelidini): Stelis lateralis sn; Megachilidae (Trypetini): Heriades leavitti sn cp

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Agapostemon sericea sn cp, Agapostemon texanus texanus sn (Rb, Re), Agapostemon virescens (MH), Augochlorella aurata sn cp, Augochlorella striata sn, Augochloropsis metallica metallica sn, Halictus confusus sn cp fq, Halictus ligatus sn cp fq, Halictus rubicunda sn cp, Lasioglossum cinctipes sn cp, Lasioglossum coreopsis sn cp fq, Lasioglossum foxii sn, Lasioglossum obscurus (MH), Lasioglossum pectoralis sn cp, Lasioglossum pilosus pilosus sn cp fq (Rb, MH), Lasioglossum pruinosus sn cp (Rb, MH), Lasioglossum tegularis (MH), Lasioglossum versatus sn cp fq; Andrenidae (Andreninae): Andrena rudbeckiae sn; Andrenidae (Panurginae): Calliopsis andreniformis sn fq, Heterosarus albitarsis sn

Wasps
Sphecidae (Bembicinae): Bembix americana (Rb, Re), Bicyrtes ventralis, Glenostrictia pictifrons; Sphecidae (Philanthinae): Cerceris sp. (Re), Cerceris prominens; Sphecidae (Sphecinae): Ammophila kennedyi, Ammophila nigricans, Ammophila pictipennis, Ammophila procera, Prionyx atrata, Prionyx thomae; Vespidae (Eumeninae): Euodynerus annulatus, Stenodynerus anormis, Stenodynerus histrionalis; Braconidae: Cardiochiles abdominale

Flies
Stratiomyidae: Anoplodonta nigrirostris; Syrphidae: Eristalis flavipes, Eristalis stipator, Eristalis tenax, Eristalis transversus, Helophilus latifrons, Sphaerophoria contiqua, Syrphus ribesii, Toxomerus marginatus (Rb, Re); Bombyliidae: Exoprosopa decora, Exoprosopa meigenii, Parabombylius coquilletti fq, Rhynchanthrax parvicornis, Systoechus vulgaris, Toxophora amphitea; Conopidae: Physocephala tibialis, Thecophora occidensis, Zodion fulvifrons; Tachinidae: Archytas analis, Chetogena claripennis, Cylindromyia fumipennis, Linnaemya comta, Physocephala tibialis, Spallanzania hesperidarum, Tachinomyia panaetius, Thecophora occidensis, Zodion fulvifrons; Muscidae: Neomyia cornicina, Stomoxys calcitrans; Calliphoridae: Lucilia illustris, Lucilia sericata; Anthomyiidae: Leucophora siphonina; Milichiidae: Eusiphona mira

Butterflies
Nymphalidae: Phyciodes tharos, Speyeria cybele, Vanessa virginiensis; Lycaenidae: Strymon melinus; Pieridae: Colias philodice, Pieris rapae, Pontia protodice; Papilionidae: Papilio troilus

Skippers
Hesperiidae: Erynnis juvenalis, Pholisora catullus, Poanes zabulon, Polites themistocles

Moths
Ctenuchidae: Cisseps fulvicollis; Noctuidae: Anagrapha falcifera

Beetles
Cerambycidae: Typocerus sinuatus fp np; Meloidae: Epicauta cinereus fp np; Mordellidae: Mordella marginata sn

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Faunal Associations

The flowers are visited by many kinds of insects, especially long-tongued bees, short-tongued Halictine bees, and flies. Other insect visitors include wasps, butterflies, skippers, moths, and beetles. These insects usually seek nectar from the flowers, although bees often collect pollen for their larvae and adult beetles eat pollen. The long-tongued bee Melissodes coreopsis (Coreopsis Miner Bee) is an oligolege of Coreopsis spp. The caterpillars of the moths Tornos scolopacinarius (Dimorphic Gray) and Eynchlora acida (Wavy-Lined Emerald) feed on the foliage of this and other coreopsis species. Mammalian herbivores occasionally consume the foliage of Prairie Coreopsis, including rabbits, groundhogs, livestock, and probably deer.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Coreopsis palmata

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Coreopsis palmata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full sun and mesic to dry conditions. This plant isn't fussy about soil characteristics, but will grow readily in soil that is loamy, sandy, gravelly, or full of clay. It is an easy to plant to grow, but may sprawl unless it receives full sun and rather lean treatment. It can spread aggressively. The foliage usually remains in good condition until hard frosts during the fall.
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Wikipedia

Coreopsis palmata

Coreopsis palmata is a species of flowering plant in the aster family, Asteraceae It is native to the east-central United States. Its common names include stiff tickseed, wedgeleaf coreopsis,[1] prairie coreopsis,[2] prairie tickseed,[3] and finger coreopsis.[4]

The plant is a perennial herb reaching about 80 centimeters in maximum height. The leaf blades are often lobed, but are not divided into leaflets as in some similar species. The flower heads contain ray florets up to 2.5 centimeters long, or sometimes longer.[5] They are yellow, and generally a paler shade of yellow than related native Coreopsis.[3] The center of the head has many disc florets that bloom yellow and darken as they dry.[5] The plants flower in summer[5] and the herbage may age red in the fall.[4]

The native habitat of this species includes woods and prairie.[4][5]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Coreopsis palmata. Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS).
  2. ^ Coreopsis palmata. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN).
  3. ^ a b Coreopsis palmata. Missouri Botanical Garden.
  4. ^ a b c Coreopsis palmata. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. University of Texas, Austin.
  5. ^ a b c d Coreopsis palmata. Flora of North America.
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