Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

This native annual plant is 6-18" tall. It forms a low rosette during the fall and bolts during the spring. The central stem is four-sided and stout, sometimes with fine hairs along the ridges. This stem may branch dichotomously in the upper half of the plant. The opposite leaves are up to 3" long and 1" across, oblong in shape, and they usually clasp the stem. Each leaf has a prominent central vein, and a margin that is smooth or with a few coarse teeth toward the base. Usually, there are fine hairs along the margins. The upper stems produce flat-topped clusters of small white flowers. A typical flower cluster will be about ½–¾" across and contain 4-12 flowers, which are surrounded by triangular green bracts.  Each flower is about 1/8" across, and consists of a short corolla with 5 small lobes that are without notches at their tips. There are 3 white stamens, and a central stigma with a tripartite style at its tip. The blooming period occurs from mid- to late spring, and lasts about a month. There is little or no floral scent. Each flower is replaced by a ridged 3-chambered fruit that is oval-shaped and longer than it is wide. Only one chamber of the fruit is fertile, which contains a single seed. The root system consists of a slender, branching taproot that is white.
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Ecology

Associations

Faunal Associations

Miscellaneous insects visit the flowers primarily for nectar, including small bees, Eumenine wasps, Syrphid flies, and other kinds of flies. Among the bees, are such visitors as Little Carpenter bees (Ceratina spp.), Carder bees (Hylaeus spp.), Mason bees (Osmia spp.), and various Halictid bees. Like other species of Corn Salad, the foliage is non-toxic and may be eaten by mammalian herbivores. It is unclear if the seeds can pass through their gullets and still germinate.
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Flower-Visiting Insects of Corn Salad in Illinois

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Valerianella radiata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full sun and moist conditions. This plant will grow in soil that is loamy or somewhat gravelly. Partial sun and more mesic conditions are also tolerated, although growth will be less robust. Disease and insects don't seem to bother this plant to any significant degree. This plant has a strong tendency to form colonies by re-seeding itself. Range & Habitat
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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