Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Arnoglossum floridanum occurs in 29 counties in Florida, from Madison and Taylor Counties east to Duval County and south to Brevard, Highlands, and Manatee Counties. There are no validated Georgia records.

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants to 100 cm (weakly rhizomatous). Stems 5-ribbed. Basal leaves: blades (usually with 5 main veins from bases) ovate to elliptic, to 18 cm, margins entire. Cauline leaves: proximal petiolate, ovate, margins crenulate; distal petiolate or sessile, smaller. Involucres 12–15 mm. Phyllaries (light green) ovate, midvein wings uniform or highest at apices. Corollas white or light green, (9–)11–12 mm. Cypselae fusiform, 5 mm (green); pappi 7–8.5 mm. 2n = 50, 52.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Cacalia floridana A. Gray, Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts 19: 52. 1883; Conophora floridana (A. Gray) Nieuwland; Mesadenia floridana (A. Gray) Greene
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Longleaf pine/oak/wiregrass sandhills, dry longleaf pine/oak/palmetto flatwoods, sand pine scrub, and along roadsides and clearings through such habitats.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Fairly widespread. Well distributed throughout range. Not difficult to find in proper habitat, but tends to have localized, scattered populations. Several protected populations. Threats operate mostly on private lands and on long-term scale but there is a general declining trend due to loss of habitat.

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Global Short Term Trend: Decline of 10-30%

Comments: General decline due to loss of habitat.

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Threats

Comments: Threats include loss of habitat from agriculture and citrus crops, pine plantations, suburban sprawl, commercial development. Fire suppression is a constant threat in areas not under a fire management plan.

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Notes

Comments

Arnoglossum floridanum is known only from central peninsular Florida.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: The genus name "Cacalia" was used for a group of plants now generally recognized as belonging to eight genera, and has been variously used for differing portions of that group. In 1998, the Committee for Spermatophyta published (Taxon 47: 444) its decision to reject this name nomenclaturally, in order to avoid confusion. Thus, all plants formerly called Cacalia must now be classified into other genera. LEM 3Jun98.

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