Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Occurs in northcentral Florida, from Highlands and Hardee counties north to Nassau and Baker counties and in three counties in southeastern Georgia (Chafin 2000; Chafin 2007; Patrick et al. 1995).

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Leaves: basal blades mostly 5–25 × 1–8 cm, bases tapering to petiolar portions; cauline smaller, linear (bractlike) distally. Corollas ca. 3 mm. Cypselae 3–3.5 mm.
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Diagnostic Description

This species is monotypic, superficially resembling some Eupatoriums, but different in pappus and achene character, in aromatic character, as well as in leaf. As Small (1933) commented, the foliage in general appearance most resembles that of the sea lavender Limonium (Kral 1983).

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Type Information

Possible Type for Hartwrightia floridana A. Gray ex S. Watson
Catalog Number: US 1401472
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): S. H. Wright
Locality: Marshes, Volusia Co., Fla., Volusia, Florida, United States, North America
  • Possible Type: Watson, S. 1888. Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts Sci. 23: 265.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Wet, peat-enriched, usually sphagnous substrates, mostly in full sunlight or light shade. Typical habitat is slash pine/longleaf pine - saw palmetto - gallberry - titi flatwoods, pineland swamps or bogs, and acidic seepage areas (Kral 1983).

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 - 80

Comments: In Florida, there are approximately 50 occurrences observed since 1989 and 20 others last observed earlier. However, some of these Florida occurrences may potentially be combined (A. Jenkins, pers. comm. 2009). In Georgia, eight populations are known (Chafin 2007).

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General Ecology

Kral (1983) states that he has never observed the species in grazed areas, even where it was "abundant just the other side of a pasture fence."

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Persistence: PERENNIAL

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Reproduction

Flowers in this species are all perfect and fertile (Godfrey & Wooten 1981), while the family as a whole is predominantly outcrossing (although there are many exceptions). Pollinators listed are common for Asteraceae. The seed is a sticky achene without a prominent pappus (Godfrey & Wooten 1981); thus it may be dispersed by exozoochory or myrmechory.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Hartwrightia floridana

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hartwrightia floridana

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: This is a regional endemic, that ranges from northcentral Florida to southeastern Georgia. Few occurrences are adequately protected. The species suffers from a severe loss of habitat due to development, conversion of native habitat to pine plantation, and drainage.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: Very high - high

Comments: Threatened by ditching, draining, mechanical site preparation, and lack of fire (Chafin 2000; Chafin 2007).

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