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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known from northeastern Mexico, from central Nuevo Leon southward including half of Tamaulipas, northern San Luis Potosi and Veracruz and extreme eastern Hidalgo.
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Continent: Middle-America
Distribution: Mexico (Tamaulipas, San Luis Potosi, Hidalgo [HR 32: 276])  
Type locality: Tamaulipas, 21 km north of Villagran.
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Source: The Reptile Database

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species habitats include mesquite-grassland, thornforest and tropical deciduous forest. It is associated with small water bodies.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2007

Assessor/s
Lavin, P., Mendoza-Quijano, F. & Hammerson, G.A.

Reviewer/s
Cox, N., Chanson, J.S. & Stuart, S.N. (Global Reptile Assessment Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern, because it is relatively widespread (>50,000 km²), and its population is not currently declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
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Population

Population
It is a rare species. The current population trend is unknown. There are few data on population size, however the species is rarely encountered. Although it is suspected that the population is declining as a result of habitat loss and collection, there are currently no data to support this.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Habitat loss and modification for livestock agriculture (cattle grazing) is a major threat. The species is rare and therefore is more attractive to collectors.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Habitat protection is needed, particularly in southeastern Tamaulipas. Further research on biology, range, population and threats is needed.
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Wikipedia

Agkistrodon bilineatus taylori

Common names: Taylor's cantil,[2] ornate cantil.

Agkistrodon bilineatus taylori is a venomous pitviper subspecies[3] found only in northeastern Mexico. It is named in honor of American herpetologist, Edward Harrison Taylor.

Contents

Description

A. b. taylori, juvenile.

Adults usually attain a length of 64–90 cm (25⅛–35⅜ inches), with some growing to 96 cm (37¾ inches). The subspecies has a heavy body and a relatively long tail: 16-19% of total body length in males and 13-18% in females.[4]

Geographic range

Found in Mexico in the northeastern states of Nuevo Leon, San Luis Potosí and Tamaulipas.[2] The type locality is "21 km north of Villagrán, Tamaulipas, Mexico."[1]

Conservation status

This species is classified as Least Concern (LC) on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (v3.1, 2001).[5] Species are listed as such due to their wide distribution, presumed large population, or because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category. The population trend is unknown. Year assessed: 2007.[6]

Feeding

Feeds primarily on rodents and amphibians. Juveniles are known to employ the yellowish tip of their tail as a lure to attract small insectivorous vertebrates. The yellowish tip fades as the animals mature, as does this behavior.

Taxonomy

Elevated to species status by Parkinson, Zamudio and Greene (2000) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

Captivity

Because of their attractive coloration and relatively small size, they are somewhat popular in the exotic pet trade, with captive bred individuals occasionally being available. The care requirements are fairly basic, similar to A. contortrix. These snakes are, however, not for the inexperienced keeper. The venom is significantly stronger than that of A. contortrix and can cause severe tissue damage and even death if untreated. Dry bites are seldom reported, and these snakes may strike repeatedly.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b McDiarmid RW, Campbell JA, Touré T. 1999. Snake Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference, vol. 1. Herpetologists' League. 511 pp. ISBN 1-893777-00-6 (series). ISBN 1-893777-01-4 (volume).
  2. ^ a b Gloyd HK, Conant R. 1990. Snakes of the Agkistrodon Complex: A Monographic Review. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles. 614 pp. 52 plates. LCCN 89-50342. ISBN 0-916984-20-6.
  3. ^ "Agkistrodon bilineatus taylori". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=586229. Retrieved 2 November 2006.
  4. ^ Campbell JA, Lamar WW. 2004. The Venomous Reptiles of the Western Hemisphere. Comstock Publishing Associates, Ithaca and London. 870 pp. 1500 plates. ISBN 0-8014-4141-2.
  5. ^ Agkistrodon taylori at the IUCN Red List. Accessed 14 September 2007.
  6. ^ 2001 Categories & Criteria (version 3.1) at the IUCN Red List. Accessed 14 September 2007.

Further reading

  • Parkinson CL, Zamudio KR, Greene HW. 2000. Phylogeography of the pitviper clade Agkistrodon: historical ecology, species status, and conservation of the cantils. Mol. Ecol. 9:411-420.
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