Overview

Distribution

Virginian, southside of Cape Cod to Cape Hatteras
translation missing: en.license_cc_by_4_0

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 1.0 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 95 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 25 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 402
  Temperature range (°C): 15.723 - 24.978
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.366 - 14.219
  Salinity (PPS): 36.053 - 36.465
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.666 - 4.895
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.070 - 0.808
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.232 - 6.191

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 402

Temperature range (°C): 15.723 - 24.978

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.366 - 14.219

Salinity (PPS): 36.053 - 36.465

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.666 - 4.895

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.070 - 0.808

Silicate (umol/l): 1.232 - 6.191
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Vermicularia spirata

Vermicularia spirata, common name the West Indian worm-shell or the West Indian wormsnail, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Turritellidae.[1] Juveniles can move around, but larger individuals become sessile.

Distribution[edit]

Vermicularia spirata occurs in shallow water in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. Its range includes Mexico, Cuba, Jamaica, the Cayman Islands, the Lesser Antilles and Puerto Rico.[1]

Description[edit]

The maximum recorded shell length is 90 mm.[2]

Habitat[edit]

The minimum recorded depth for this species is 3 m; the maximum recorded depth is 80 m.[2]

Biology[edit]

Vermicularia spirata is a filter feeder and is a protandrous hermaphrodite; individuals start their adult life as males, at which stage they are free-living, but later become females and attach themselves to various substrates. Many are found embedded in the tissues of the white encrusting sponge Geodia gibberosa.[3]

Male individuals, being motile, are able to move to the vicinity of the aperture of the sessile females before liberating sperm into the water. Capsules containing eggs are brooded in the mantle cavities of the females. The ova are about 300μm in diameter and the veliger larvae that hatch have two and a half whorls of shell and are about 600μm long. These crawl or swim away and soon undergo metamorphosis into juveniles which are all males. They feed on phytoplankton and grow rapidly.[3]

In Bermuda, the endemic hermit crab Calcinus verrillii sometimes uses the vacated tube of Vermicularia spirata as a home, even though it is non-mobile.[4]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Vermicularia spirata (Philippi, 1836).  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 17 May 2010.
  2. ^ a b Welch J. J. (2010). "The "Island Rule" and Deep-Sea Gastropods: Re-Examining the Evidence". PLoS ONE 5(1): e8776. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0008776.
  3. ^ a b Bieler, Rüdiger; Hadfield, Michael G. (1990). "Reproductive biology of the sessile gastropod Vermicularia spirata (Cerithioidea: Turritellidae)". Journal of Molluscan Studies 56 (2): 205–219. doi:10.1093/mollus/56.2.205. 
  4. ^ Rodrigues, Lisa J.; Dunham, David W.; Coates, Kathryn A. (2000). "Shelter Preferences in the Endemic Bermudian Hermit Crab, Calcinus verrilli (Rathbun, 1901) (Decapoda, Anomura)". Crustaceana 73 (6): 737–750. JSTOR 20106336. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!