Overview

Comprehensive Description

Taxonomic History

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Biology

Oak woodland in mixed colonies with host Temnothorax curvispinosus
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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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NEARCTIC: USA (MA)
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Protomognathus americanus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
D2

Version
2.3

Year Assessed
1996
  • Needs updating

Assessor/s
Social Insects Specialist Group

Reviewer/s

Contributor/s
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Wikipedia

Protomognathus

Protomognathus americanus is a species of ant that is 2–3 mm in size and the sole member of the genus Protomognathus. It is endemic to the northeastern United States and adjacent Canadian regions.[1] P. americanus is a species of slave-maker ant. They do not forage for food, but instead 'scout workers' from the colony seek out nearby host colonies of ants, steal larvae and bring them back to their own colony. A small P. americanus colony could consist of a queen, two to five workers and thirty to sixty slaves.[2]

In a study published in Animal Behaviour, researchers showed that P. americanus scouts target stronger colonies over weaker ones to steal larvae from.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Social Insects Specialist Group 1996. Protomognathus americanus. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 10 August 2007.
  2. ^ a b Davies, Davies (8 November 2010). "Slave-making ants target the strong not the weak". BBC News. Retrieved 21 August 2014. 
  3. ^ Pohl, Sebastian; Foitzik, Susanne (2011). "Slave-making ants prefer larger, better defended host colonies". Animal Behaviour 81 (1): 61–68. doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2010.09.006. Retrieved 20 August 2014. 
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