Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs in Mediterranean and sub-Mediterranean zones from extreme northeastern Italy through southwestern Slovenia, Croatia, southern Bosnia-Herzegovina, southern Montenegro to northwestern Albania. It is present on many Adriatic islands. The species ranges from sea level up to 1,400 m asl.
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Continent: Europe
Distribution: Croatia (incl. Brusnik Island, Mali Opuh Island, Vrtlac Island, Kaprije Island, Islands Korcula [= Curzola] and San Massimo, Kamik Island, St. Andrea Island near Dubrovnik, Island Mali Parsanj near Vis, Jidula Island, Island Mali Barjak near Vis, Kornati Archipelago, including surrounding Islands, Vis Island [= Lissa], Kurjak Island, Island Mikavica, north of Zirje Island, Jerolim Island near Hvar), Jabuka Island [= Pomo], Island Veliki Opuh, southeast of the Kornati Archipelago, Ciovo Island near Split), Svetac Island [= St. Andrea]), Italy (Trieste region),  coastal regions of Slovenia, Montenegro (including many Adriatic Islands),  NW Albania
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is found in dry open woodland, scrub, pastures and overgrown areas. It can be found on cliffs, rocks and stone walls. The females lays two to eight eggs per clutch.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2009

Assessor/s
Rastko Ajtic, Wolfgang Böhme, Petros Lymberakis, Jelka Crnobrnja Isailovic, Roberto Sindaco

Reviewer/s
Cox, N. and Temple, H.J. (Global Reptile Assessment)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a degree of habitat modification, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

History
  • 2006
    Least Concern
    (IUCN 2006)
  • 2006
    Least Concern
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Population

Population
It is a relatively common species.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There appear to be no major threats to this species overall. Some distinct island populations may be threatened by the introduction of cats and other predators (such as the Indian mongoose on some Adriatic islands [Roberto Sindaco pers. comm., October, 2008]).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is listed on Annex II of the Bern Convention and Annex IV of the EC Habitats Directive. It is known from the Skadar Lake Protected Area in Montenegro. There are no further conservation actions currently needed.
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Wikipedia

Dalmatian Wall Lizard

The Dalmatian wall lizard (Podarcis melisellensis) is a species of lizard in the Lacertidae family.[2] It is found in Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Italy, Serbia and Montenegro, and Slovenia.[1][3] Its natural habitats are temperate forests, Mediterranean-type shrubby vegetation, rocky areas, and pastureland.[1]

Dalmatian wall lizards grow up to 65 mm (2.6 in) in snout–vent length. Tail is about twice as long as the body. Female lizards lay 2–8 eggs. Juveniles are about 25 mm (0.98 in) in snout–vent length upon hatching.[3]

These lizards display three ventral color morphs: yellow, orange and white. A male that is an orange color morph is seen as a more dominant male than any other morph in intrasexual competition, since the orange color displays the lizard as more aggressive. Orange morph lizards have a larger size and bite force so they can ward off competing males in order to mate with a female of choice and claim territory [4] In this species of lizards, the females prefer the orange males since the orange males are bigger and healthier and can give a female’s offspring high quality indirect benefits.[4] Even though females prefer to mate with orange morphs, they will still mate with yellow morphs. Yellow morph lizards give females more direct benefits like protection and small territory than indirect benefits. Meanwhile, white males are only able to mate by intruding on another male’s territory and mating with other male’s females.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Rastko Ajtic, Wolfgang Böhme, Petros Lymberakis, Jelka Crnobrnja Isailovic, Roberto Sindaco (2009). "Podarcis melisellensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 6 April 2014. 
  2. ^ Podarcis melisellensis at the Reptarium.cz Reptile Database. Accessed 5 April 2014.
  3. ^ a b Arnold, Nicholas; Ovenden, Denys (2002). A field guide to the reptiles and amphibians of Britain and Europe (2 ed.). London: HarperCollins. p. 169. ISBN 9780002199643. 
  4. ^ a b Huyghe, K.; Vanhooydonck, B.; Herrel, A.; Tadić, Z.; Van Damme, R. (2012). "Female lizards ignore the sweet scent of success: Male characteristics implicated in female mate preference". Zoology 115 (4): 217–222. doi:10.1016/j.zool.2011.11.001. PMID 22561096.  edit
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