Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 1240 specimens in 182 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 629 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 1112
  Temperature range (°C): 9.435 - 29.336
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.043 - 29.722
  Salinity (PPS): 31.845 - 37.566
  Oxygen (ml/l): 0.308 - 6.421
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.046 - 2.232
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.777 - 27.850

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 1112

Temperature range (°C): 9.435 - 29.336

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.043 - 29.722

Salinity (PPS): 31.845 - 37.566

Oxygen (ml/l): 0.308 - 6.421

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.046 - 2.232

Silicate (umol/l): 0.777 - 27.850
 
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:5,087Public Records:2,358
Specimens with Sequences:4,105Public Species:244
Specimens with Barcodes:4,073Public BINs:395
Species:448         
Species With Barcodes:400         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Gobiinae

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Wikipedia

Gobiinae

Gobiinae, the true gobies, are a subfamily of the goby family (Gobiidae). They are found in all oceans and a few rivers and lakes, but most live in warm waters. Altogether, the Gobiinae unite almost 2000 described species in 150 genera, and new ones are still being discovered in numbers.

Description and ecology[edit]

They are usually mid-sized to small ray-finned fishes; some are very colorful, while others are cryptic. Most true gobies are less than 10 cm (4 in) long when fully grown. The largest species (tank goby, Glossogobius giuris) can reach up to 50 cm (20 in); the smallest known species as of 2010, Trimmatom nanus, is just about one cm (half an inch) in length when fully grown, making it one of the smallest vertebrates.

In many true gobies, the pelvic fins have grown together into a suction cup they can use to hold on to substrate. Most have two dorsal fins, the first made up from spiny fin rays, while the other has some spines in the front followed by numerous soft rays.

They are most plentiful in the tropical and subtropical regions, but as a group are almost cosmopolitan in marine ecosystems. A few species tolerate brackish water, and some – Padogobius and Pomatoschistus species – even inhabit freshwater. They are generally benthic as adults (the spawn can distribute widely by ocean currents), only the bearded goby (Sufflogobius bibarbatus) is noted to be quite pelagic throughout its life. Most inhabit some sort of burrow or crevice and are somewhat territorial. In some cases, they live in symbioses with unrelated animals, such as crustaceans.

The larger species are fished for food, in some cases on a commercial scale. Many Gobiinae species are popular aquarium fish. Especially popular are the colorful species, some of which are regularly traded. In general, the interesting behavior and bold habits make most true gobies seem attractive pets. However, their territoriality and because even the smallest species are fundamentally carnivorous and need living food to thrive make them not easy to keep (particularly compared to the related sleeper gobies family Eleotridae). As typical for oceanic fishes, many Gobiinae tend to be almost impossible to breed in captivity, and some species have become rare from habitat destruction and overfishing.

Genera[edit]

Clown goby (Microgobius gulosus) in threatening pose
The blackeye goby (Rhinogobiops nicholsii) can change its color, but the black dorsal fin spot remains the same
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