Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (200,000-2,500,000 square km (about 80,000-1,000,000 square miles)) Originally found in Quebec and New Brunswick west to Alberta and south to Wyoming, Arkansas, and Virginia (Burch, 1989); western occurrences are strongly disjunct and specimens from the WA and MT populations need to be compared in detail with more easterly occurrences, in view of the fact that speciation has occurred in several other genera with disjunct species swarms with both eastern and western representation. Recently, the species has been found in several lakes in the Clark Fork and Flathead drainages, Lake Roosevelt, WA, Ferry Co., WA, the Flathead Indian Reservation, MT; searches in ID turned up no sites (Frest and Johannes 1995).

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Range Description

This species was originally found in Quebec and New Brunswick west to Alberta and south to Wyoming, Arkansas, and Virginia (Burch, 1989); western occurrences are strongly disjunct and specimens from the Washington and Montana populations need to be compared in detail with more easterly occurrences, in view of the fact that speciation has occurred in several other genera with disjunct species swarms with both eastern and western representation. Recently, the species has been found in several lakes in the Clark Fork and Flathead drainages, Lake Roosevelt, Washington, Ferry Co., the Flathead Indian Reservation, Montana, searches in Idaho turned up no sites (Frest and Johannes 1995).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat Type: Freshwater

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found in freshwater rivers and tributaries.

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Depth range based on 2 specimens in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 2 - 6

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 2 - 6
 
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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

Comments: Unknown pending studies to determine if western populations are morphologically distinct; if not, numerous occurrences probably still exist. In the Cuyahoga Valley National Park (between Cleveland and Akron, Ohio), this species was recently found only in Salt Run in the park (Smith et al., 2002). In Alberta, it is found hroughout the province except in the southwestern corner (Lepitzki, 2001). Jokinen (2005) found it in a pond at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore but it has not been found elsewhere in Indiana (Pyron et al., 2008). Freeman and Perkins (1997) found it in the Niobrara River, Nebraska in Cottonwood Lake, Cherry Co.

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Global Abundance

10,000 to >1,000,000 individuals

Comments: Unknown, once again, pending studies; could be quite abundant if all known populations do represent the same species. Multiple forms (= morphs) exist for this species (Burch 1989, Frest and Johannes 1995), though none of them have been elevated to specific or subspecific level.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: This species has a wide range but is, at times, disjunct. More work is necessary to determine the species' current status in WA, ID, and MT; some older population specimens need to be rechecked and compared to determine if speciation has occurred (western populations could be morphologically distinct), until which time the species' current abundance and distribution is uncertain (Frest and Johannes 1995). This species, although seldom recorded, has a wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is not in decline or is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2011

Assessor/s
Cordeiro, J. & Perez, K.

Reviewer/s
Böhm, M. & Collen, B.

Contributor/s
Dyer, E., Soulsby, A.-M., Whitton, F., McGuinness, S., De Silva, R., Milligan, H.T., Kasthala, G., Herdson, R., Thorley, J., McMillan, K. & Collins, A.

Justification
Valvata tricarinata has been assessed as Data Deficient due to the lack of information regarding its distribution, population and threat processes impacting this species. Although this species has a wide range it is at times disjunct. More work is necessary to determine the species' current status in Washington, Idaho and Montana; some older population specimens need to be rechecked and compared to determine if speciation has occurred (western populations could be morphologically distinct), until which time the species' current abundance and distribution is uncertain (Frest and Johannes 1995). Lack of distribution data from more recent times, in addition to documented declines in most of its historical range, does not justify a Least Concern category. Further research is required before an accurate assessment can be made.
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Global Short Term Trend: Decline of 10-30%

Comments: Probably declining due to range loss (Frest and Johannes 1995).

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Population

Population
There are no population data available for this species.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Degree of Threat: B : Moderately threatened throughout its range, communities provide natural resources that when exploited alter the composition and structure of the community over the long-term, but are apparently recoverable

Comments: Modification, poisoning, and eutropification of kettle lakes pose threats. In particular, nutrient enhancement due to farm animal wastes, sewage, or to irrigation runoff may so eutropify lakes as to exclude this species. Most kettle lakes in its western U.S. range have been so affected, or have been made part of irrigation systems (Frest and Johannes 1995).

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Major Threats
Threats to this species are unknown.
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Management

Biological Research Needs: As speciation has occurred in several other genera with disjunct species swarms with both eastern and western representation, specimens from WA and MT populations need to be compared in detail with more easterly occurrences (Frest and Johannes 1995).

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Global Protection: Unknown whether any occurrences are appropriately protected and managed

Comments: Some occurrence on public lands, including the Flathead Indian Reservation and Bureau of Reclamation reservoirs (Frest and Johannes 1995). In the Cuyahoga Valley National Park (between Cleveland and Akron, Ohio), this species was recently found only in Salt Run in the park (Smith et al., 2002).

Needs: Until more is known about this species and its current distribution, existing sites should be protected.

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Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no conservation measures in place. Further research is recommended regarding the distribution, population trends and threat processes impacting this species.
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Wikipedia

Valvata tricarinata

Valvata tricarinata, common name the three-ridge valvata or threeridge valvata, is a species of small freshwater snail with a gill and an operculum, an aquatic gastropod mollusk in the family Valvatidae, the valve snails.

Distribution[edit]

This species occurred in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and along the Gulf of Maine.

Shell description[edit]

There is great variation in the degree of carination of the shell.[2]

Paleontology[edit]

Valvata tricarinata is abundant in nearly all lacustrine and fluviatile deposits in North America of the Pleistocene period. The fossil shells are more variable than the Recent ones.[2] There were described eight forms or subspecies.[2]

References[edit]

This article incorporates public domain text from the reference.[2]

  1. ^ IUCN (2008). 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 20 November 2008.
  2. ^ a b c d Frank C. Baker. July 1921. New forms of Pleistocene molluks of Illinois. The Nautilus, volume 35, number 1, 22-24.
  • Turgeon, D.D., et al. 1998. Common and scientific names of aquatic invertebrates of the United States and Canada. American Fisheries Society Special Publication 26
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