Overview

Comprehensive Description

The common Atlantic marginella, Prunum apicinum, is conical with a smooth, short spire and three to four whorls (Andrews 1994; Abbot & Morris 1995). The aperture is long and narrow with a thick outer lip that is notched at the base, and a columella with four distinct folds. Shell color varies from highly polished cream or yellow to grayish tan with a white outer lip bearing reddish brown spots.
  • Abbott, RT & PA Morris. 1995. Shells of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and the West Indies, 4th Edition. Houghton Mifflin. New York, NY. USA. 350 pp.
  • Andrews, J. 1994. A Field Guide to Shells of the Florida Coast. Gulf Publishing. Houston, TX. USA. 182 pp.
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Distribution

The range of P. apicinum extends from North Carolina through the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico to the Yucatán (Andrews 1994; Abbot & Morris 1995). Individuals are found on submerged tidal flats and in shallow seagrass beds.Indian River Lagoon (India River Lagoon) Distribution: P. apicinum can be found throughout the India River Lagoon on sand flats and in shallow seagrass beds.
  • Abbott, RT & PA Morris. 1995. Shells of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and the West Indies, 4th Edition. Houghton Mifflin. New York, NY. USA. 350 pp.
  • Andrews, J. 1994. A Field Guide to Shells of the Florida Coast. Gulf Publishing. Houston, TX. USA. 182 pp.
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Physical Description

Size

The common Atlantic marginella is a small gastropod with an average length of 12 mm (Andrews 1994; Abbot & Morris 1995).
  • Abbott, RT & PA Morris. 1995. Shells of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and the West Indies, 4th Edition. Houghton Mifflin. New York, NY. USA. 350 pp.
  • Andrews, J. 1994. A Field Guide to Shells of the Florida Coast. Gulf Publishing. Houston, TX. USA. 182 pp.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Look Alikes

The shape and size of P. apicinum distinguish the species from other marginellas and olives. Of these, the bell marginella, P. bellum, and the orange marginella, P. carneum, may be the most easily confused. The bell marginella is smaller than P. apicium, longer and more slender, and usually white throughout (Abbot & Morris 1995). The orange marginella is generally larger and shiny orange in color, with white bands on the body whorl.
  • Abbott, RT & PA Morris. 1995. Shells of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and the West Indies, 4th Edition. Houghton Mifflin. New York, NY. USA. 350 pp.
  • Andrews, J. 1994. A Field Guide to Shells of the Florida Coast. Gulf Publishing. Houston, TX. USA. 182 pp.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 47 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 4 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0.6 - 152
  Temperature range (°C): 11.329 - 26.658
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.632 - 13.639
  Salinity (PPS): 35.373 - 36.229
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.099 - 4.714
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.085 - 0.963
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.334 - 7.514

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0.6 - 152

Temperature range (°C): 11.329 - 26.658

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.632 - 13.639

Salinity (PPS): 35.373 - 36.229

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.099 - 4.714

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.085 - 0.963

Silicate (umol/l): 1.334 - 7.514
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Trophic Strategy

Information on the diet of P. apicinum is scarce, but the species likely scavenges organic material from the sand. Predators: Like other small snails, P. apicinum is probably preyed upon by a variety of fishes, crustaceans and larger predatory snails.
  • Abbott, RT & PA Morris. 1995. Shells of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and the West Indies, 4th Edition. Houghton Mifflin. New York, NY. USA. 350 pp.
  • Andrews, J. 1994. A Field Guide to Shells of the Florida Coast. Gulf Publishing. Houston, TX. USA. 182 pp.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Associations

Although there are no obligate associations documented between the common Atlantic marginella and other species, P. apicinum is commonly found alongside organisms from the tidal flats and seagrass beds in which it resides. For more extensive information on these ecosystems and their associated species found in and around the IRL, please visit the Tidal Flat and Seagrass habitat pages.
  • Abbott, RT & PA Morris. 1995. Shells of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and the West Indies, 4th Edition. Houghton Mifflin. New York, NY. USA. 350 pp.
  • Andrews, J. 1994. A Field Guide to Shells of the Florida Coast. Gulf Publishing. Houston, TX. USA. 182 pp.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Known prey organisms

  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Known predators

Marginella apicina (Predatory gastropods) is prey of:
Urophycis floridana
Prionotus scitulus
Prionotus tribulus
sediment POC

Based on studies in:
USA: Florida (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Population Biology

Little information exists concerning the abundance of P. apicinum, but it is considered the most common of the marginellas throughout the southeast United States (Abbot & Morris 1995). Temperature &
  • Abbott, RT & PA Morris. 1995. Shells of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and the West Indies, 4th Edition. Houghton Mifflin. New York, NY. USA. 350 pp.
  • Andrews, J. 1994. A Field Guide to Shells of the Florida Coast. Gulf Publishing. Houston, TX. USA. 182 pp.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Wikipedia

Prunum apicinum

Prunum apicinum is a species of small sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Marginellidae, the margin snails.[1]

Description[edit]

Distribution[edit]

P. apicinum can be found in Atlantic waters, ranging from North Carolina to the Virgin Islands.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Prunum apicinum (Menke, 1828).  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 24 April 2010.
  2. ^ Felder, Darryl L & Sylvia A. Earle. Gulf of Mexico Origin, Waters, and Biota: Biodiversity. Corpus Christi, TX: Texas A&M University-Corpus Cristi Press, 2009. 659.
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