Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (>2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)) It occurs from texas to Iowa and upper Michigan east to the Atlantic seaboard and central Maine (Nekola, 2009).

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Geographic Range

The flat disc snail is found in the eastern United States. It is one of the more common land snails found in Michigan.

Biogeographic Regions: nearctic (Native )

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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

The shell of these snails is approximately 3/4 inch in diameter and has a height of about 1/2 inch. The shell is opaque and flattened with 5 to 5 1/2 convex whorls. The shell opening is roundish with a somewhat partial lip.

When alive, the shell of this shell is a glossy, greenish-white to pale yellow color. If only the shell remains, it is whitish to palest brown.

Average length: 19.0 mm.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat Type: Terrestrial

Comments: It occurs in mesic, often rocky forest (Nekola, 2009).

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These snails prefer humid, hardwood forests, leaf litter, or inhabiting the ground under decaying logs. They are found in floodplains of river valleys.

Habitat Regions: temperate ; terrestrial

Terrestrial Biomes: forest

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

Food Habits

This snail is carnivorous, feeding on other Gastropoda and snail eggs. They have been known to ingest dead snail shells as well, perhaps as a source of minerals.

Flat disc snails will find food sources by following prey slime trails. When they have captured the prey, a snail will pull the prey to a hidden area to feed. As they grow in size, they will feed on increasingly larger prey, from eggs to young snails to adults.

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Associations

Ecosystem Roles

Flat disc snails are a predators on other snails as well as prey for larger animals. It may also be an intermediate host for cestodes.

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Predation

Known Predators:

  • Aves
  • Squamata

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: > 300

Comments: Although reported by Hubricht (1985) from Penobscott Co., Maine, it was not found in a survey of 101 sites in eastern Maine by Nekola (2008). In New York, Hotopp and Pearce (2007) report it from 17 counties mostly in central to western New York but also in the New York metro and Long Island area. Lewis (2005) includes cave occurrences in Tennessee in Mill Hollow Cave in Overton Co. Waggoner et al. (2006) found this species in abundance in surveys of the Sipsey Wilderness Area, Bankhead National Forest, northwest Alabama. In Kentucky, there are scattered records across the state including recently in Land Between the Lakes in western Kentucky (Dourson and Feeman, 2006) while Schroeder (2008) documented this species from Nelson Co., Kentucky. In central Canada, it is abundant in Ontario, but confined in Quebec to the far south (Nekola, 2009).

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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan/Longevity

This snail probably has a lifespan similar to other snails, of about one year.

Average lifespan

Status: wild:
1.0 years.

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Reproduction

Key Reproductive Features: simultaneous hermaphrodite; fertilization (Internal ); oviparous

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Haplotrema concavum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: It occurs from texas to Iowa and upper Michigan east to the Atlantic seaboard and central Maine.

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Importance for Humans: Positive

Since this snail is a carnivore, it may contribute to reducing pest snails.

Positive Impacts: controls pest population

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Wikipedia

Haplotrema concavum

Haplotrema concavum, the gray-footed lancetooth, is a species of predatory air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family Haplotrematidae.

Contents

Distribution

The snail is native to the humid hardwood forests of eastern North America, from Southern Canada and the Great Lakes region, south through the Midwestern U.S. including eastern Nebraska and Oklahoma, and through the Southeastern United States, including the Gulf States. It is found along the Apalachicola River in western Florida and Georgia. [2]

Haplotrema concavum is found living in leaf litter near the base of trees, or under rotting logs. [2]

Feeding habits

Haplotrema concavum is carnivorous species. It is known to be a predator for example on Patera clarki nantahala.[3]

Parasites

Parasites of Haplotrema concavum include:

References

  1. ^ Binney, William G. (1878). The Terrestrial Air-Breathing Mollusks of the United States and Adjacent Territories of North America. Vol. 5 (plates). Bull. Mus. Comparative Zool., Harvard. Plate 21.
  2. ^ a b UF—IFAS . accessed 4.14.2013
  3. ^ North Carolina Ecological Services & U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2008. Noonday Globe in North Carolina. <http://www.fws.gov/nc-es/snail/noonglobe.html>, accessed 1 November 2008.
  4. ^ Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment. "Brainworm". accessed 14 December 2010.
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