Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

The nudibranchs called by this name are probably an aggregate species consisting of Doto species which share the characteristics of red pigment spots on the tips of the ceratal tubercles and red pigment in the pseudobranch region on the inner face of each ceras. There are red to maroon pigment spots or streaks on the body. The smooth rhinophores have sheaths with dilated margins. The body is translucent white. Typically about 10mm in length. The newly described species Doto hydrallmaniae and Doto sarsiae have only recently been separated from this complex by electrophoretic methods. It is likely that other morphs are also good sibling species.
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Source: Encyclopedia of Marine Life of Britain and Ireland

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Distribution

northern Gaspe waters, southern Gaspe waters (Baie des Chaleurs, Gaspe Bay to American, Orphan and Bradelle banks; eastern boundary: eastern Bradelle Valley), upper North Shore (between Sept- Iles and Pointe des Monts), middle North Shore (from Sept- Iles to Cape Whittle, including the Mingan Islands); western slope of Newfoundland, including the southern part of the Strait of Belle Isle but excluding the upper 50m in the area southwest of Newfoundland; New Jersey
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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A common species recorded from all round the British Isles. The type locality is on the Dutch coast and records from the North Sea associated with Eudendrium would be of great interest.
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Ecology

Habitat

infralittoral of the Gulf and estuary
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Depth range based on 32 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 8 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 108
  Temperature range (°C): 10.816 - 12.863
  Nitrate (umol/L): 4.820 - 7.634
  Salinity (PPS): 34.305 - 35.343
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.910 - 6.174
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.373 - 0.731
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.643 - 4.559

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 108

Temperature range (°C): 10.816 - 12.863

Nitrate (umol/L): 4.820 - 7.634

Salinity (PPS): 34.305 - 35.343

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.910 - 6.174

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.373 - 0.731

Silicate (umol/l): 2.643 - 4.559
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Individuals of this complex have been taken on a variety of hydroids. The spawn consists of a ribbon which is laid in a concertina fashion.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Doto coronata

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Doto coronata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Crowned doto

The crowned doto, Doto coronata, is a species of small sea slug or nudibranch, a dendronotid nudibranch, a shell-less marine gastropod mollusc in the family Dotidae. [1]

Contents

Distribution

This species is found in the North Atlantic Ocean (European waters, Canada, Gulf of Maine) and the Mediterranean Sea (Greece). Around the South African coast it is found from the Atlantic coast to Knysna. It is known from the intertidal to 25 m.[2]

Drawing of Doto coronata from Kunstformen der Natur (1904)

Description

The crowned doto is a small (up to 15 mm) pale-bodied nudibranch, with darkly mottled grape-bunch-like clusters of cerata extending in pairs down the body. The rhinophores extend from cup-like sheaths.[3] May be confused with the feathered doto, Doto pinnatifida, but the cerata of this species are shorter and plumper than those of the feathered doto.

It is the host of the ectoparasitic crustaceans Doridicola agilis Leydig, 1853 and Splanchnotrophus brevipes Hancock & Norman, 1863 and the endoparasitic crustacean Lomanoticola brevipes (Hancock & Norman, 1863)

Ecology

The crowned doto feeds on hydroids. Its egg mass is a tightly coiled white spiral of several turns, usually laid on hydroids.

References

  1. ^ a b Gofas, S. (2011). Doto coronata (Gmelin, 1791). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=139631 on 2012-05-17
  2. ^ GOSLINER, T.M. 1987. Nudibranchs of Southern Africa ISBN 0-930118-13-8
  3. ^ ZSILAVECZ, G. 2007. Nudibranchs of the Cape Peninsula and False Bay. ISBN 0-620-38054-3
  • Gosner, K.L. 1971. Guide to identification of marine and estuarine invertebrates: Cape Hatteras to the Bay of Fundy. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 693 p.
  • Abbott, R.T. (1974). American Seashells. 2nd ed. Van Nostrand Reinhold: New York, NY (USA). 663 pp.
  • Linkletter, L.E. 1977. A checklist of marine fauna and flora of the Bay of Fundy. Huntsman Marine Laboratory, St. Andrews, N.B. 68 p
  • Backeljau, T. (1986). Lijst van de recente mariene mollusken van België [List of the recent marine molluscs of Belgium]. Koninklijk Belgisch Instituut voor Natuurwetenschappen: Brussels, Belgium. 106 pp.
  • Turgeon, D.D., et al. 1998. Common and scientific names of aquatic invertebrates of the United States and Canada. American Fisheries Society Special Publication 26
  • Gofas, S.; Le Renard, J.; Bouchet, P. (2001). Mollusca, in: Costello, M.J. et al. (Ed.) (2001). European register of marine species: a check-list of the marine species in Europe and a bibliography of guides to their identification. Collection Patrimoines Naturels, 50: pp. 180-213
  • Trott, T.J. 2004. Cobscook Bay inventory: a historical checklist of marine invertebrates spanning 162 years. Northeastern Naturalist (Special Issue 2): 261 - 324.
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