Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is only known to occur in the vicinity of Port St Johns, in South Africa (Tolley and Burger 2007). Tolley and Burger (2007) estimate this species' extent of occurrence as 1,950 km, and the area of occupancy as 45 km.
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Continent: Africa
Distribution: Republic of South Africa (E Cape Province)  
Type locality: Pondoland, South Africa
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Source: The Reptile Database

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species usually prefers low coastal forest (Branch 1998, Tolley and Burger 2007).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B1ab(i,iii,iv)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Tolley, K.

Reviewer/s
Bhm, M., Collen, B. & Ram, M. (Sampled Red List Index Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s
De Silva, R., Milligan, H.T., Wearn, O.R., Wren, S., Zamin, T., Sears, J., Wilson, P., Lewis, S., Lintott, P. & Powney, G.

Justification
Bradypodion caffer has been assessed as Endangered because its extent of occurrence is less than 5,000 km, it is only found in one location, and there is a continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat. Conservation measures are required to reduce the rate of habitat loss currently occurring.
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Population

Population
There is no population information available for this species.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Habitat degradation in the Eastern Cape has been attributed to overgrazing by domestic livestock, clearing of land for agriculture, fuel-wood collection, invasion by introduced plants, and urbanization, all of which are likely to be threatening this species' habitat (Driver et al. 2005).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is listed on the CITES Appendix II. Further surveys are required to refine the area of occupancy estimate.

In 2008 this species was found in the Silaka Nature Reserve, the only protected area in which it has been found (K. Tolley and J. Measey pers. comms. 2010).
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Wikipedia

Transkei dwarf chameleon


The Transkei dwarf chameleon (Bradypodion caffer) is a chameleon endemic to the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa.[1][2] It is also known as the Pondo dwarf chameleon.[1]

Reproduction[edit]

Transkei dwarf chameleon are ovoviviparous.[2]

Habitat and conservation[edit]

Transkei dwarf chameleon inhabit low coastal forests. This habitat is deteriorating because of overgrazing by domestic livestock, clearing of land for agriculture, fuel-wood collection, invasion by introduced plants, and urbanization. The species occurs in the Silaka Nature Reserve, but is not known from other protected areas.[1]

Male Transkei dwarf chameleon, submissive coloration
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