Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known from mid-altitudes of western slopes of the Andes in Pichincha, Ecuador, from four localities around the town of Mindo, Pichincha province (S. Poe pers. comm. 2010, J.B. Losos pers. comm. 2010, Yánez-Muñoz et al. 2010). The furthest localities are only 13 km away from each other. Searches for the species in other areas around Mindo, including areas of better forest habitat, have not yet found any new localities (S. Poe pers. comm. 2010). However, the theoretically probable range of this species may be much larger, but confirmation of this depends on individuals being found in new localities. For example, it may also occur further north in the province of Imbabura and further south in the provinces of Cotopaxi and Santo Domingo de los Tsachilas (Yánez-Muñoz et al. 2010). Its currently known area of occupancy was estimated as 33 km2 (Yánez-Muñoz et al. 2010), and the estimated extent of occurrence is no more than 200 km2 (based on a maximum distance of 13 km between the furthest localities). All known individuals of this species are found in fewer than five locations. It has been found from altitudes ranging between 1,200 and 1,650 m above sea level (S. Poe pers. comm. 2010, Yánez-Muñoz et al. 2010).
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Continent: South-America
Distribution: Ecuador (Pichincha), Peru ?  
Type locality: “Neighbourhood of Cunuco, a small town at 1200 meters elevation, five kilometers northwest of Mindo, on the south bank of the Rio Mindo, a northern tributary of the upper Rio Blanco, in Pichincha Province, Ecuador”
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Source: The Reptile Database

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found in montane forest habitat. The areas around Mindo, where this species has been collected, are made up of pasture land and secondary forest; however this species has been predominantly found in vegetation along a road (S. Poe pers. comm. 2010). It is a slow-moving, cryptically coloured species that occurs high in trees (J.B. Losos pers. comm. 2010). This species is named for its proboscis, an appendage extending from its snout, which is used in courtship.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B1ab(iii)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Mayer, G.C. & Poe, S.

Reviewer/s
Böhm, M., Collen, B. & Ram, M.

Contributor/s
De Silva, R., Milligan, H.T., Wearn, O.R., Wren, S., Zamin, T., Sears, J., Wilson, P., Lewis, S., Lintott, P. & Powney, G.

Justification
Anolis proboscis is a forest specialist with a restricted range. It is listed as Endangered because its known extent of occurrence is no larger than 200 km2, its area of occupancy was estimated as 33 km2 and all individuals are in fewer than five locations, as individuals have so far been found in only four locations, predominantly in vegetation along a single stretch of road. There is a continuing decline in the quality of its habitat due to logging, grazing and other human pressures, which is likely to cause declines in this species. More research is needed on the distribution and population of this species, as it may also be found in provinces to the north and south of Mindo, based on available habitat. Protected areas covering this species' distribution need to be established and population monitoring is recommended.
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Population

Population
There are no population data available for this species. However, the species was found to be relatively abundant at some localities (J.B. Losos pers. comm. 2010).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
The area in which this species is distributed has experienced major habitat loss due to logging, human settlement, agriculture, and grazing. This is likely to cause declines in this species, as due to its small range, it is more vulnerable to habitat alteration (J.B. Losos pers. comm. 2010).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
No conservation measures are currently in place for this species. Research is required to ascertain whether the species ranges beyond the region of Pichincha, Ecuador, and as this species has a restricted range new protected areas should be established. Research and monitoring is necessary to establish the population trend of the species.
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Wikipedia

Anolis proboscis

Anolis proboscis is a small lizard belonging to the genus Anolis of the family Dactyloidae. It was discovered in 1953 in Ecuador and formally described by Peters and Orces in 1956.
Pinocchio lizard was presumed extinct when it was not seen after the original collections- It was observed by a birding group in 2005. In August 2009, a herpetology expedition led by Dr Steven Poe and accompanied by his graduate students from the University of New Mexico successfully rediscovered the species in a remote region of Ecuador. In total, they found five individuals including three males and the first two females ever seen and collected. Since 2009, several other expeditions, using the information published by Poe et al.[2] have been able to relocate the species in remote regions of Ecuador.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mayer, G.C. and Poe, S. (2009). "Anolis proboscis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 6 October 2013. 
  2. ^ Poe et al. (2009) Morphology, Phylogeny, and Behavior of Anolis proboscis, Brevoioria Museum of Comparative Zoology, Number 530
  3. ^ Main, D. (2013-10-04). "Once 'Extinct' Pinocchio Lizard Pokes His Nose Out". LiveScience.com. Retrieved 2013-10-08. 


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