Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology/Natural History: Predators include the seastars Evasterias troschelii and Orthasterias koehleri. Dead shells of this species are often colonized by boring sponges such as Cliona celata var californiana.

The name "jingle shell" comes from the fact that the dead shells make a pleasant jingling sound when struck together. People often make mobile chimes from them, using the handy byssal hole to hang them.

Pododesmus macrochisma is now an Alaskan species, different from this species.

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Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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This unique bivalve species has thin valves, nearly circular in outline. The right valve is permanently cemented to the substrate (rock, wood, abalone shells, or plastic). The right valve has a large hole in it near the hinge, through which byssal material cements the bivalve to the rock (photo). The left valve has a dark muscle scar opposite the perforation in the right shell, and is otherwise polished inside and often bright iridescent green (probably from algae living within the shell). Flesh is bright orange. Diameter to 10 cm.
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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Distribution

Geographical Range: Bering Sea, Alaska to Baja California; Chukchi Sea

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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Physical Description

Look Alikes

How to Distinguish from Similar Species: There is no other local species similar to this. Oysters cement one shell to the substrate but they are much larger, have thick shells, and do not have the hole in the shell through which a byssus attaches. The rock scallop Hinnites gigantea is larger, has a thicker shell with no hole in it, and has a deep purple stain on the inside of the shell near the hinge.
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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 35 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 25 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): -1 - 61
  Temperature range (°C): 10.151 - 10.151
  Nitrate (umol/L): 6.725 - 6.725
  Salinity (PPS): 31.893 - 31.893
  Oxygen (ml/l): 6.561 - 6.561
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.943 - 0.943
  Silicate (umol/l): 15.658 - 15.658

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): -1 - 61
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Depth Range: Low intertidal to 90 m

Habitat: Cemented to rocks, plastic, or wood. Common on pilings

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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pododesmus macrochisma

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 7
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Pododesmus macrochisma

Pododesmus macrochisma, common name the Alaska jingle, is a species of saltwater clam, a marine bivalve mollusk in the family Anomiidae, the jingle shells.

References

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