Overview

Comprehensive Description

10. Myrmecia piliventris HNS .

Worker. Length 6 lines.-Black: the abdomen covered with pale golden pubescence; mandibles porrect, nearly straight, rounded above, longitudinally grooved beneath, somewhat obliquely truncate at the apex, the tip slightly bent, the inner edge with a few minute teeth directed backwards. The head longitudinally striated, the thorax very coarsely so, the striation on the metathorax transverse. Abdomen: the basal node coarsely rugose, with a longitudinal central carina beneath, terminating in a strong tooth at the base.

Hab. Australia. (Coll. F. Smith.)

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Taxonomic History

Myrmecia (Pristomyrmecia) piliventris Smith, 1858a PDF: 146 (w.) AUSTRALIA. AntCat AntWiki

Taxonomic history

Combination in Myrmecia (Pristomyrmecia): Emery, 1911e PDF: 21; in Myrmecia (Promyrmecia): Wheeler, 1933i: 67; in Promyrmecia: Clark, 1943 PDF: 140; in Myrmecia: Brown, 1953j: 20.
Senior synonym of Myrmecia rectidens: Brown, 1953j: 20.
See also: Crawley, 1926 PDF: 385; Clark, 1951 PDF: 156.
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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Taxonomic Treatment

Smith, F.:
  Worker. Length 6 lines.-Black: the abdomen covered with pale golden pubescence; mandibles porrect, nearly straight, rounded above, longitudinally grooved beneath, somewhat obliquely truncate at the apex, the tip slightly bent, the inner edge with a few minute teeth directed backwards. The head longitudinally striated, the thorax very coarsely so, the striation on the metathorax transverse. Abdomen: the basal node coarsely rugose, with a longitudinal central carina beneath, terminating in a strong tooth at the base.
  Hab. Australia. (Coll. F. Smith.)
 
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Worker. Length 6 lines.-Black: the abdomen covered with pale golden pubescence; mandibles porrect, nearly straight, rounded above, longitudinally grooved beneath, somewhat obliquely truncate at the apex, the tip slightly bent, the inner edge with a few minute teeth directed backwards. The head longitudinally striated, the thorax very coarsely so, the striation on the metathorax transverse. Abdomen: the basal node coarsely rugose, with a longitudinal central carina beneath, terminating in a strong tooth at the base.

 

Hab. Australia. (Coll. F. Smith.)

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Smith, F.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Myrmecia piliventris

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Myrmecia piliventris

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Myrmecia piliventris

Myrmecia piliventris (commonly named golden tail bull ant) is an Australian ant which belongs to the Myrmecia genus. This species is native to Australia. The Myrmecia piliventris is distributed Australia wide, but they're not too common in the western regions of Australia.[1]

Characteristics[edit]

The typical size for a worker is around 10-15.5 millimetres long. The species is black mostly, with the exceptions where the mandibles, antennae and legs are dark brown. The tarsi is lighter but with a more reddish tone. The abdomen is a golden yellow colour. They have similarities to some Myrmecia species as they do not have teeth, which most of its kind contain.[2][3][4]

The Myrmecia piliventris has a genome similar to that of the jack jumper ant. However its chromosome complement is n=2, higher than the jack jumper ant, but most of its relatives of the Myrmecia genus have a much higher chromosome count.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Myrmecia piliventris Smith, 1858". Atlas of Living Australia. Govt of Australia. Retrieved 13 March 2014. 
  2. ^ Clark, John (1951). The Formicidae of Australia (Volume 1). Melbourne: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia. pp. 156–158. 
  3. ^ Mayr, G. (1876). "Die australischen Formiciden". Journal des Museum Godeffroy 12: 93. 
  4. ^ Wheeler, GC (1971). Ant larvae of the subfamily Myrmeciinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Pan-Pac. p. 251. 
  5. ^ Taylor, R.W., Imai, H.T. (1986). The exceptionally low chromosome number n=2 in an Australian bulldog ant Myrmecia piliventris. p. 20. 
  6. ^ Taylor, R.W. (1990). Notes on the remarkable karyology of the primitive ant Nothomyrmecia macrops, and of the related genus Myrmecia (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Hindawi Publishing. 


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