Overview

Brief Summary

Introduction

Histioteuthis celetaria is a poorly understood species with only 25 known specimens.

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Comprehensive Description

Nomenclature

Voss, et al. (1998) consider this taxon a subspecies, H. celetaria celetaria.

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Characteristics

  1. Photophores
    1. Basal Row with 9 photophores and a single sawtooth (see arrow in photograph at right).

    Figure. Ventral view of the posterior margin of the head of H. celetaria, 39 mm ML, NMNH specimen, preserved. Photograph by R. Young.

  2. Club suckers

    Figure. Oral view of a club sucker of H. celetaria, ventral series, holotype. Drawing from Voss (1969, Fig.15b).

    1. Suckers of 3 ventral-marginal rows of manus with broad, asymmetrical outer rings.
    2. Central suckers of manus only slightly enlarged.

    Figure. Oral view of the left tentacular club of H. celetaria, holotype. Drawing from Voss (1969, Fig.15e).

Comments

More details of the description can be found here.

Species of the celetaria-group are characterized by:

  1. Head photophores:
    1. Type 1b pattern on head.
    2. Basal Row of head with 9 or 10 photophores.
    3. Right Basal Series of head absent.
    4. Arms IV with 3 longitudinal series on arm base (drawing below).

      Figure. Ventral view of right arm IV, holotype, 39 mm ML, female. Drawing from Voss (1969, Fig.15f).
    5. Most species with separate group of 4-8 compound photophores on ends of arms IV (drawing above) (Voss, et al., 1998). Apparently this feature is absent in H. inermis.
    6. Compound photophores of large, uniform size and evenly spaced on anterior 2/3 of ventral mantle.
  2. Tubercles
    1. Absent.

The species differ in the following manner:

Character H. celetaria H. inermis H. pacifica H. sp. A
Club suckers
Asymmetrical outer
sucker rings in:
3 ventral-marginal
sucker series
No asymmetrical rings 2 ventral-marginal
sucker series
No asymmetrical rings
Size of medial
manal suckers:
Slightly larger than
marginal suckers
2 X marginal suckers 1.5 X marginal suckers Slightly larger than
marginal suckers
Large manal-sucker dentition: 12-13 teeth on distal margin 20-27 teeth on entire margin 28-32 teeth on entire margin 15-20 teeth on distal margin
Photophores
Single sawtooth in
Basal Row photophore pattern:
Yes No sawtooth No sawtooth Yes
Number of photophores in Basal Row: 9 10 9 9

With the exception of the analysis of head photophores and the inclusion of H. inermis in this species group, most of the information presented here is from Voss (1969) and Voss, et al . (1998)

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Distribution

Range Description

Apparently excluding the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, Histioteuthis celetaria occurs in the tropical and subtropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean (Young and Vecchione 2000).
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circum-(sub)tropical
  • UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Geographical distribution

Type locality:Northwestern Atlantic, 32°10'N,64° 45'W. H. celetaria occupies tropical and subtropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean. However, it appears to be absent from the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea (Voss et al., 1998).

Figure. Distribution chart of H. celetaria modified from Voss, et al. (1998).

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This oceanic species is distributed in the subtropical and tropical waters of the Atlantic with highest abundances appearing to be associated with the productive regions of this ocean (Voss et al. 1998). Small juveniles have been collected in open nets between the surface waters and 800 m in depth, larger individuals have been taken between 750 and 1,010 m where mating and spawning appear to take place (Voss et al. 1998). At maturity, females attain much larger body sizes (~258 mm in mantle length) compared to males (~87 mm in mantle length) (Voss et al. 1998). Mature spermatophore length is unknown as are paralarval stages; mature oocyte length averages 1.9 mm in length (Voss et al. 1998, Young and Vecchione 2000).

Histioteuthids typically undergo diel vertical migrations and often occur in high abundances (Voss et al. 1992). Sexually mature adults often demonstrate changes in photophore and body morphology, and descend to deeper depths (e.g. to more than 2,000 m in depth; Voss et al. 1998, Young and Vecchione 2007). They are important in the diets of a variety of marine mammals, seabirds and fish (Voss et al. 1998).

Systems
  • Marine
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mesopelagic
  • UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms
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Depth range based on 12 specimens in 3 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 3 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 210 - 902.5
  Temperature range (°C): 4.330 - 16.589
  Nitrate (umol/L): 5.588 - 35.877
  Salinity (PPS): 34.469 - 36.361
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.430 - 4.860
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.299 - 2.421
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.017 - 58.059

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 210 - 902.5

Temperature range (°C): 4.330 - 16.589

Nitrate (umol/L): 5.588 - 35.877

Salinity (PPS): 34.469 - 36.361

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.430 - 4.860

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.299 - 2.421

Silicate (umol/l): 2.017 - 58.059
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Life History

Single mature female (258 mm ML) and male (87 mm ML) known; mature eggs are 1.9 mm in diameter (Voss, et al, 1998). The smallest specimen illustrated is a 10.3 mm subadult. Paralarvae are unknown.

Figure. Ventral view of young H. celetaria from the stomach of Alepisaurus ferox taken off Madeira, 10.3 mm ML. Drawing from Voss, 1969 (Fig. 15d).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2014

Assessor/s
Barratt, I. & Allcock, L.

Reviewer/s
Vecchione, M., Young, R. & Böhm, M.

Contributor/s
Duncan, C. & Carrete-Vega, G.

Justification

Very little is known about Histioteuthis celetaria, and it is only known from a handful of specimens, making it impossible to make an accurate assessment of its extinction risk. We therefore consider it to be Data Deficient. Further research is recommended in order to better understand the precise distribution, population dynamics, life history and ecology, and the potential threat processes affecting this species.

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Population

Population
There is no population information available for this species.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
The threats to this species are not known.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. Further research is recommended in order to determine the precise distribution, population dynamics, life history and ecology, and potential threat processes affecting this species.
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