Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 389
Specimens with Sequences: 513
Specimens with Barcodes: 258
Species: 34
Species With Barcodes: 34
Public Records: 51
Public Species: 19
Public BINs: 30
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Wikipedia

Aromobatidae

Aromobatidae are a family of frogs native to Central and South America.[2][3][4] They are sometimes referred to as cryptic forest frogs. They are the sister taxon of Dendrobatidae, the poison dart frogs, but are not toxic as most dendrobatids are.[1][4]

Taxonomy[edit]

Aromobatidae were separated from Dendrobatidae only in 2006, and some sources continue to treat these frogs as part of Dendrobatidae.[5] However, their position as the sister taxon of Dendrobatidae is well supported, and the question is primarily about whether Aromobatidae should be ranked as a family or a subfamily.[2][3]

The validity of subfamilies within Aromobatidae is also unsettled. There is evidence pointing to paraphyly of at least the Anomaloglossinae subfamily, and genus Allobates, largely because of the uncertain placement of Allobates olfersioides.[2][3]

Reproduction[edit]

Many aromobatids deposit small clutches of eggs in terrestrial nests. After hatching, one of the parents transports the tadpoles to a small water body where they complete their development to metamorphosis.[4]

Subfamilies and species[edit]

By 2014, 117 species in three subfamilies and five genera had been described:[2]

  • Allobatinae Grant, Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad, Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler, 2006 (48 sp.)
    • Allobates Zimmermann and Zimmermann, 1988 (48 sp.)
  • Anomaloglossinae Grant, Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad, Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler, 2006 (31 sp.)
    • Anomaloglossus Grant, Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad, Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler, 2006 (29 sp.)
    • Rheobates Grant, Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad, Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler, 2006 (2 sp.)
  • Aromobatinae Grant, Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad, Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler, 2006 (37 sp.)

In addition, "Prostherapis" dunni Rivero, 1961 is placed in this family, but its more precise placement is unknown; it might be an Aromobates.[6]

Selected Aromobatidae species
Picture of frog Allobates talamancae
Picture of frog Anomaloglossus stepheni
Picture of frog Rheobates palmatus
Picture of frog Mannophryne trinitatis against glass

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Grant, T., Frost, D. R., Caldwell, J. P., Gagliardo, R., Haddad, C. F. B., Kok, P. J. R., Means, D. B., Noonan, B. P., Schargel, W. E., and Wheeler, W. C. (2006). "Phylogenetic systematics of dart-poison frogs and their relatives (Amphibia: Athesphatanura: Dendrobatidae)". Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History (American Museum of Natural History) 299: 1–262. doi:10.1206/0003-0090(2006)299[1:PSODFA]2.0.CO;2. 
  2. ^ a b c d Frost, Darrel R. (2014). "Aromobatidae Grant, Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad, Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler, 2006". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 30 August 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c Blackburn, D.C.; Wake, D.B. (2011). "Class Amphibia Gray, 1825. In: Zhang, Z.-Q. (Ed.) Animal biodiversity: An outline of higher-level classification and survey of taxonomic richness". Zootaxa 3148: 39–55. 
  4. ^ a b c Vitt, Laurie J.; Caldwell, Janalee P. (2014). Herpetology: An Introductory Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles (4th ed.). Academic Press. pp. 486–488. 
  5. ^ "Dendrobatidae". AmphibiaWeb: Information on amphibian biology and conservation. [web application]. Berkeley, California: AmphibiaWeb. 2014. Retrieved 30 August 2014. 
  6. ^ Frost, Darrel R. (2014). ""Prostherapis" dunni Rivero, 1961". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 30 August 2014. 
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