Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Herbs, shrubs or trees, often hispid or scabrid. Stipules 0. Leaves alternate, rarely opposite or subopposite, simple. Inflorescence usually a cyme, which is often scorpioidal, sometimes a panicle or raceme. Flowers bisexual or unisexual, actinomorphic or sometimes zygomorphic. Calyx usually 5-lobed. Corolla 5-lobed. Stamens (or staminodes) as many as corolla lobes. Ovary superior, entire or 4-lobed; 2(-4)-locular. Style 1, terminal or gynobasic. Fruit mostly consisting of 4 nutlets, less often 1 nutlet or a drupe.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / miner
communal larva of Agromyza abiens mines leaf of Boraginaceae

Foodplant / parasite
cleistothecium of Golovinomyces cynoglossi parasitises live Boraginaceae

Foodplant / sap sucker
nymph of Graptopeltus lynceus sucks sap of Boraginaceae

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / open feeder
adult of Longitarsus anchusae grazes on leaf of Boraginaceae

Foodplant / open feeder
adult of Longitarsus nasturtii grazes on leaf of Boraginaceae
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / feeds on
Mogulones asperifoliarum feeds on Boraginaceae

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:2167
Specimens with Sequences:2023
Specimens with Barcodes:1198
Species:564
Species With Barcodes:512
Public Records:1270
Public Species:426
Public BINs:0
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Boraginaceae

The Boraginaceae, the borage or forget-me-not family, includes a variety of shrubs, trees, and herbs, totaling about 2,000 species in 146 genera found worldwide. [3]

According to the APG II, the Boraginaceae belongs among the euasterid I group, including the orders Gentianales, Lamiales, and Solanales, but whether it should be assigned to one of these orders or to its own (Boraginales) is still uncertain. Under the older Cronquist system it was included in Lamiales, but it is now clear that it is no more similar to the other families in this order than they are to families in several other asterid orders. The Boraginaceae is paraphyletic with respect to Hydrophyllaceae and the latter is included in the former in the APG II system. In some recent classifications the Boraginaceae is broken up into several families: Boraginaceae sensu stricto, Cordiaceae, Ehretiaceae, Heliotropiaceae, Lennoaceae, and Hydrophyllaceae.

These plants have alternately arranged leaves, or a combination of alternate and opposite leaves. The leaf blades usually have a narrow shape; many are linear or lance-shaped. They are smooth-edged or toothed, and some have petioles. Most species have bisexual flowers, but some taxa are dioecious. Most pollination is by hymenopterans, such as bees. Most species have inflorescences that have a coiling shape, at least when new. The flower has a usually five-lobed calyx. The corolla varies in shape from rotate to bell-shaped to tubular, but it generally has five lobes. It can be green, white, yellow, orange, pink, purple, or blue. There are five stamens and one style with one or two stigmas. The fruit is a drupe, sometimes fleshy.[4]

Most members of this family have hairy leaves. The coarse character of the hairs is due to cystoliths of silicon dioxide and calcium carbonate. These hairs can induce an adverse skin reaction, including itching and rash in some individuals, particularly among people who handle the plants regularly, such as gardeners. In some species, anthocyanins cause the flowers to change color from red to blue with age. This is may be a signal to pollinators that a flower is old and depleted of pollen and nectar.[5]

Well-known members of the family include:

Genera[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (2009). "An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG III" (PDF). Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 161 (2): 105–121. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8339.2009.00996.x. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  2. ^ "Boraginaceae Juss., nom. cons.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2007-04-12. Retrieved 2009-04-02. 
  3. ^ Boraginaceae. Diversityoflife.com
  4. ^ Watson, L. and M. J. Dallwitz. 1992 onwards. Boraginaceae Juss. The Families of Flowering Plants. Version: 19 August 2013.
  5. ^ Hess, D. 2005. Systematische Botanik. ISBN 3-8252-2673-5
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