Overview

Distribution

Distribution and Habitat

Southwest arid zone of Western Australia. Most common along the wheatbelt and adjacent gold fields from the Murchison River south to Tambellup and east to Jerramungup and Frank Hann National Park and Lort River.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 157600 km2.Eastern side of Tarrah Forest, Wandoo Forest, Salmonsum Woodlands.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • CALM Salinity Action Plan Survey frog collections, which will be deposited in Western Australia Museum Collection.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:136
Specimens with Sequences:133
Specimens with Barcodes:133
Species:5
Species With Barcodes:5
Public Records:0
Public Species:0
Public BINs:0
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Conservation

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Adults are active on the surface during summer and autumn nights.Calling begins with winter rains in April or May. Terrestrial egg deposition in burrows in a foam nest; aquatic tadpole. Between 250 – 700 eggs are laid and hatch 10 days to 4 weeks later. Tadpoles have been found in ponds of milky and clear water. Burrows in the banks or under stones on the bed of sandy shallow, ephemeral water courses in swamps or at the vertical edges of clay pans.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • CALM Salinity Action Plan Survey frog collections, which will be deposited in Western Australia Museum Collection.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
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Threats

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Extent of occurrence > 20,000km2 . Area of occupancy equals extent of occurrence. Not fragmented, large number of small and large populations. Found on east side of Tarrah Forest and throughout Wuemben of Western Australia. Numerous records from CALM salinity surveys from pit traps and hearing calling males. Detailed surveys central Wuemben by R.A. Davis.

Threats
May have been affected by vegetation clearing and resultant dry land salinity, but is still widespread.

Conservation Measures
Protected by W.A. Legislation preventing collection.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • CALM Salinity Action Plan Survey frog collections, which will be deposited in Western Australia Museum Collection.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
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© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2015 The Regents of the University of California

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Wikipedia

Heleioporus

Heleioporus is a genus of frogs native to Australia. Of the six species in this genus, five live in south-west Western Australia, while the other one species only occurs in south-eastern Australia. All members of this genus are medium to large sized burrowing frogs with rounded heads, short bodies, bulging eyes, short limbs and the hands are free from webbing. The toes are relatively short with only a trace of fleshy webbing. A characteristic of this genus (except for Heleioporus eyrei and some Heleioporus psammophilus) is the black nuptial spines that male frogs have on their first and occasionally second and third fingers. The pupil restrict to form a vertical slit and the tympanum is usually distinct. All the species in this genus call from burrows where the eggs are later deposited in a foam mass. Embryos develop in this mass until hatching. Hatching occurs after the burrows are flooded with water, and may be delayed until this happens. The calls of these species are similar although differ in frequency, length, note and repetition rate.

Species

Common nameBinomial name
Western Spotted FrogHeleioporus albopunctatus (Gray, 1841)
Giant Burrowing FrogHeleioporus australiacus (Shaw & Nodder, 1795)
Western Marsh FrogHeleioporus barycragus (Lee, 1967)
Moaning FrogHeleioporus eyrei (Gray, 1845)
Plains FrogHeleioporus inornatus (Lee & Main, 1954)
Sand FrogHeleioporus psammophilus (Lee & Main, 1954)

References

  • Barker, J. Grigg, G.C. Tyler, M.J. 1995. A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty & Sons ISBN 0-949324-61-2
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