Overview

Comprehensive Description

  • Ito, Yu, Barfod, Anders S. (2014): An updated checklist of aquatic plants of Myanmar and Thailand. Biodiversity Data Journal 2, 1019: 1019-1019, URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.2.e1019
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Plazi

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Description

Herbs or undershrubs, often aquatic, monoecious, polygamous or dioecious. Stipules 0 (but see note under Myriophyllum). Leaves alternate, opposite or whorled, simple or pinnatifid. Calyx lobes and petals 2-4 or 0, free. Stamens (0-1-)2-4 or 8. Ovary inferior, 1-4-locular. Fruit a nutlet, indehiscent or breaking up into 2 or 4 one-seeded mericarps, or a drupe.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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  • Ito, Yu, Barfod, Anders S. (2014): An updated checklist of aquatic plants of Myanmar and Thailand. Biodiversity Data Journal 2, 1019: 1019-1019, URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.2.e1019
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Plazi

Source: Plazi.org

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 240
Specimens with Sequences: 264
Specimens with Barcodes: 237
Species: 101
Species With Barcodes: 100
Public Records: 196
Public Species: 99
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Haloragaceae

Haloragaceae (the watermilfoil family) is a dicotyledon flowering plant family in the order Saxifragales, based on the phylogenetic APG III system.[1] In the Cronquist system, it was included in the order Haloragales.

Distribution[edit]

The distribution of the family is nearly worldwide. The center of species diversity is in Australia where all genera are found excepting Proserpinaca and Laurembergia. The terrestrial taxa are primarily limited to the southern hemisphere. Glishcrocaryon, Haloragodendron, Meionectes and Trihaloragis are Australian endemics.

Description[edit]

The family consists mostly of herbaceous perennials or occasionally annuals, although there are some woody taxa (Haloragodendron spp.). Some are primarily terrestrial (Glischrocaryon, Gonocarpus, Haloragis, Haloragodendron and Trihaloragis) while others are primarily semiaquatic (Laurembergia) or aquatic (Meionectes, Myriophyllum and Proserpinaca) of freshwater systems. Myriophyllum are usually monoecious while most other taxa have hermaphrodite flowers. The flowers are usually small and inconspicuous, but some genera can have more "showy" conspicuous flowers (Haloragodendron, Glischrocaryon). Flowers are usually radial (2-3)-4 parted, petals are usually keeled or hooded when present. In Myriophyllum female flowers usually lack a perianth. They have (2-)4-8 stamens and an inferior ovary of (2-)4 carpels. In Myriophyllum the fruit is a schizocarp of 1-seeded 'nutlets' other genera can have nuts or drupes that can be winged or inflated.[2][3]

Floral formula: \star \mathrm{K}^{3-4} \; \mathrm{C}^{3-4} or \mathrm{C}^0 \; \mathrm{A}^{2-8} \; \mathrm{G}^{\overline{(2-4)}}

Genera[edit]

In the family there are nine genera now recognized, with about 145 species:

The taxa of the earlier family Cercodiaceae and Myriophyllaceae are now included in the family Haloragaceae. Earlier, the genus Gunnera was included in this family.

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