Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Trees or shrubs. Leaves opposite, simple; margin entire or serrate. Stipules 0. Flowers bisexual (Curtisia) or unisexual (Afrocrania), actinomorphic, arranged in panicles (Curtisia) or in dense terminal clusters surrounded by 4 herbaceous bracts (Afrocrania); pedicels not articulated. Petals 4-5. Stamens equal in number and alternating with them. Ovary inferior, 2- or 4-locular. Fruit a drupe.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:555Public Records:279
Specimens with Sequences:507Public Species:82
Specimens with Barcodes:498Public BINs:0
Species:98         
Species With Barcodes:96         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Cornaceae

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Wikipedia

Cornaceae

Cornaceae (the dogwood family) is a cosmopolitan family of flowering plants in the order Cornales. It contains approximately 110 species, mostly trees and shrubs, which may be deciduous or evergreen. Members of this family usually have opposite or alternate simple leaves, four- or five-parted flowers clustered in inflorescences or pseudanthia, and drupaceous fruits.[1] In northern temperate areas, Cornaceae is well known from two genera: Cornus, the dogwoods, and Nyssa, the tupelos.

The systematics of Cornaceae have been remarkably unsettled and controversial, and many genera have been added to it and removed from it over time. (One researcher called it a "dustbin."[2]) Molecular phylogenetics have clarified the relatedness of some associated genera, and at least nine genera that were previously included in Cornaceae have been eliminated from the order Cornales entirely,[3] but the circumscription of Cornaceae is still unclear. The Angiosperm Phylogeny Group usually defines Cornaceae as comprising the genera Cornus and Alangium as well as the five genera often separated into the family Nyssaceae. However, many of these genera are sometimes split off into their own families (e.g. Alangiaceae), and the usage remains inconsistent.[3][4]

References

Cornus sanguineus with ladybird.jpg
  1. ^ Kubitzki, K. (2004). Cornaceae. In The Families and Genera of Vascular Plants Volume 6: Flowering Plants: Dicotyledons: Celastrales, Oxidales, Rosales, Cornales, Ericales (Kubitzki, ed.). Springer-Verlag, New York.
  2. ^ Eyde, R. H. (1988). Comprehending Cornus - puzzles and progress in the systematics of the dogwoods. Botanical Review 54, 233-351.
  3. ^ a b Fan, C. Z., and Xiang, Q. Y. (2003). Phylogenetic analyses of Cornales based on 26S rRNA and combined 26S rDNA-matK-rbcL sequence data. American Journal of Botany 90, 1357-1372.
  4. ^ APG III (2009). An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 161, 105-121.
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