Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Dioecious trees or shrubs. Trunk tall or very short, bearing spirally arranged leaf-bases and scale leaves. Leaves spirally arranged, pinnate; leaflets with longitudinal parallel veins and no midrib. Male cones consisting of leathery scales with numerous pollen-sacs on their abaxial surface. Female cones composed of thick and often woody, peltate scales bearing 2 (or more) ovules on their adaxial surface. Seeds angled, with a fleshy outer layer enclosing a hard inner shell.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 633
Specimens with Sequences: 604
Specimens with Barcodes: 541
Species: 116
Species With Barcodes: 116
Public Records: 528
Public Species: 92
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Zamiaceae

The Zamiaceae are a family of cycads that are superficially palm or fern-like. They are divided into two subfamilies with eight genera and about 150 species in the tropical and warm temperate regions of Africa, Australia and North and South America.

The Zamiaceae are perennial, evergreen, and dioecious. They have subterranean to tall and erect, usually unbranched, cylindrical stems, and stems clad with persistent leaf bases (in Australian genera).

Their leaves are simply pinnate, spirally arranged, and interspersed with cataphylls. The leaflets are sometimes dichotomously divided. The leaflets occur with several sub-parallel, dichotomously-branching longitudinal veins; they lack a mid rib. Stomata occur either on both surfaces or undersurface only.

Their roots have small secondary roots. The coral-like roots develop at the base of the stem at or below the soil surface.

Male and female sporophylls are spirally aggregated into determinate cones that grow along the axis. Female sporophylls are simple, appearing peltate, with a barren stipe and an expanded and thickened lamina with 2 (rarely 3 or more) sessile ovules inserted on the inner (axis facing) surface and directed inward. The seeds are angular, with the inner coat hardened and the outer coat fleshy. They are often brightly colored, with 2 cotyledons.

One subfamily, the Encephalartoideae, is characterized by spirally arranged sporophylls (rather than spirally orthostichous), non-articulate leaflets and persistent leaf bases. It is represented in Australia, with two genera and 40 species.

As with all cycads, members of the Zamiaceae are poisonous, producing poisonous glycosides known as cycasins.

Genera

Some classifications also place the genus Bowenia in the Zamiaceae.

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