Overview

Comprehensive Description

Baptisia cinerea (Raf.) Fernald & B.G. Schub.

Distribution

Pine savannas.

Notes

Late Apr–Jun ; Jun–Jul . Not seen in Shaken Creek Preserve by the senior author. Specimens seen in the vicinity: Sandy Run [Hancock]: Taggart SARU 129 (WNC!). [= RAB, Weakley]

  • Thornhill, Robert, Krings, Alexander, Lindbo, David, Stucky, Jon (2014): Guide to the Vascular Flora of the Savannas and Flatwoods of Shaken Creek Preserve and Vicinity (Pender & Onslow Counties, North Carolina, U. S. A.). Biodiversity Data Journal 2, 1099: 1099-1099, URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.2.e1099
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Plazi

Source: Plazi.org

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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: A regional endemic of the Coastal Plain and Piedmont of southeast Virginia to South Carolina. In North Carolina, populations are relatively common in the Sandhills mainly on properties with fire management and are less common in the counties of the Coastal Plain (NCHP 2006).

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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Perennial, Herbs, Stems woody below, or from woody crown or caudex, Plants with rhizomes or suckers, Nodules present, Stems erect or ascending, Stems or branches arching, spreading or decumbent, Stems le ss than 1 m tall, Plants turning black on drying, Stems solid, Stems or young twigs sparsely to densely hairy, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, Stipules conspicuous, Stipules green, triangulate to lanceolate or foliaceous, Stipules persistent, Stipules free, Leaves compound, Leaves palmately 2-3 foliate, Leaf or leaflet margins entire, Leaflets 3, Leaves hairy on one or both surfaces, Inflorescences racemes, Inflorescence axillary, Inflorescence terminal, Bracts very small, absent or caducous, Flowers zygomorphic, Calyx 5-lobed, Calyx hairy, Petals separate, Corolla papilionaceous, Petals clawed, Petals orange or yellow, Banner petal ovoid or obovate, Banner petal suborbicular, broadly rounded, Wing petals narrow, oblanceolate to oblong, Wing petals auriculate, Wing tips obtuse or rounded, Keel petals auriculate, spurred, or gibbous, Keel tips obtuse or rounded, not beaked, Stamens 9-10, Stamens completely free, separate, Filaments glabrous, Style terete, Style persistent in fruit, Fruit a legume, Fruit stipitate, Fruit unilocular, Fruit freely dehiscent, Fruit tardily or weakly dehiscent, Fruit elongate, straight, Fruit oblong or ellipsoidal, Fruit or valves persistent on stem, Fruit exserted from calyx, Fruit inflated or turgid, Fruit beaked, Fruit glabrous or glabrate, Fruit 11-many seeded, Seeds reniform, Seed surface smooth, Seed surface with resinous dots, Seeds olive, brown, or black.
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Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Sandhills and sandy woods; dry sandy soil. In Virginia the habitat of historical occurrences included sandy roadsides and dry woodland border. In North Carolina the habitat is characterized as dry to xeric sandy upland areas with pine-oak-wiregrass or pine-oak communities; sand ridges with pine and/or oak; powerlines, gaslines, roadsides, or other maintained open areas (B. Sorrie, NCHP, pers. comm. 2005).

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 - 300

Comments: In Virginia, no extant occurrences are known but no surveys have been done for this species. It is estimated that such surveys could find fewer than 5 occurrences. In North Carolina, it is estimated that there are over 50 extant populations in at least 13 counties. In South Carolina, this plant is listed from fifteen counties in Radford et al. (1968) and probably extant in most of these. The species is most abundant in the sandhills region, especially in Chesterfield County, where it is abundant in the Sandhills State Forest and Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge. It is less abundant farther to the south and is apparently restricted to regions north of the Santee River in the outer coastal plain. (A report from Georgia is false; this species has never been found in Georgia.)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: A regional endemic with a restricted range, but there are likely over 100 populations in the Carolinas as well as a small number in Virginia.

Environmental Specificity: Moderate. Generalist or community with some key requirements scarce.

Comments: Requires dry, sandy soil and open or absent canopy.

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Global Short Term Trend: Decline of 10-30%

Comments: Trend in Virginia is unknown, but the species is thought to be declining in the Carolinas. In North Carolina it is currently known from approximately half of the counties in its historic range.

Global Long Term Trend: Unknown

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Threats

Comments: Fire suppression and conversion of natural habitat to pine plantations, housing, etc. and maintenance activities on roadsides and in right-of-ways are expected to impact this species into the future (B. Sorrie, NCHP, pers.comm. 2005). Declines are expected in the Carolinas.

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