Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

This native vine is a summer annual about 2-6' long that branches occasionally. Its slender stems can climb by twining about adjacent vegetation; they are finely pubescent. Alternate trifoliate leaves occur at intervals along the stems. Each leaflet is about 1" long and 1/3" across; it is oblong-lanceolate, smooth along the margins, and finely pubescent on both the upper and lower sides. Each trifoliate leaf has a long petiole about 1-2" long that is also finely pubescent; there is a pair of small lanceolate bracts at the base of each petiole. No tendrils are produced by this vine. At the base of the middle to upper leaves, a slender flowering stalk (peduncle) about 1-4" long is occasionally produced. Each stalk terminates in a dense cluster of 1-6 small flowers; usually only one flower in a cluster is in bloom at a time. Each flower is up to ¼" long; it has a pale pink to purplish pink corolla. This corolla has a typical pea-like structure that consists of a standard, keel, and enclosing wings. However, the narrow keel and its wings are somewhat unusual in that they curve upward in front of the standard, instead of remaining straight. This characteristic distinguishes the Strophostyles genus from many other members of the Bean family. The short tubular calyx of each flower is light green to purple and finely pubescent; it has 4-5 shallow teeth along its rim and a pair of small bracts (bracteoles) at its base. The pedicel of each flower is very short. The blooming period occurs from late summer into the fall and lasts about 1-2 months. Each flower is short-lived and lacks any noticeable floral scent. A fertile flower is replaced by a cylindrical seedpod about 1–1½" long that has a beaked outer tip. This seedpod is initially green, but becomes dark brown with maturity; it is finely pubescent to conspicuously hairy. Each seedpod contains a few large seeds that are oblongoid in shape; they become dark, shiny, and hairless with maturity. The root system consists of a taproot. This vine spreads by reseeding itself.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Small Fuzzy Bean occurs occasionally in southern Illinois and in sandy areas of central and northern Illinois, otherwise it is uncommon or absent (see Distribution Map). Habitats include open rocky woodlands, open sandy woodlands, sandy savannas, glades, thickets, sand prairies, and sandy fields. This species is usually found in rather dry areas with sparse ground vegetation. Occasional wildfires are probably beneficial in removing competition from woody vegetation and other tall plants. Faunal Associations
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: Found in FL, AL, CO, IA, IL, IN, MN, MS, NE, NJ, PA (historically), TN (TNC Element State Tracking files). Also found in AR, KY, LA, MI, "It is primarily of the central states and seemingly only occasional in the southeast" (Isely, 1990). The species is also in TX (Correll and Johnston, 1970).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Annual, Perennial, Herbs, Vines, twining, climbing, Taproot present, Nodules present, Stems prostrate, trailing, or mat forming, Stems less than 1 m tall, Stems 1-2 m tall, Stems solid, Stems or young twigs sparsely to densely hairy, Stems hairs pilose or spreading, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, Stipules inconspicuous, absent, or caducous, Stipules persistent, Stipules free, Leaves compound, Leaves pinnately 3-foliolate, Leaves odd pinnate, Leaf or leaflet margins entire, Leaflets opposite, Stipels present at base of leaflets, Leaflets 3, Leaves hairy on one or both surfaces, Flowers in axillary clusters or few-floweredracemes, 2-6 flowers, Inflorescences globose heads, capitate or subcapitate, Inflorescence axillary, Bracteoles present, Flowers zygomorphic, Calyx 5-lobed, Calyx hairy, Petals separate, Corolla papilionaceous, Petals pinkish to rose, Banner petal suborbicular, broadly rounded, Wing petals narrow, oblanceolate to oblong, Wing tips obtuse or rounded, Keel abruptly curved, or spirally coiled, Stamens 9-10, Stamens diadelphous, 9 united, 1 free, Filaments glabrous, Style terete, Style hairy, Style hairy on one side only, Fruit a legume, Fruit unilocular, Fruit freely dehiscent, Fruit elongate, straight, Fruit exserted from calyx, Valves twisting or coiling after dehiscence, Fruit glabrous or glabrate, Fruit 3-10 seeded, Seeds ovoid to rounded in outline, Seed surface smooth, Seed surface wrinkled or rugose, Seeds olive, brown, or black, Seed surface mottled or patchy.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Small Fuzzy Bean occurs occasionally in southern Illinois and in sandy areas of central and northern Illinois, otherwise it is uncommon or absent (see Distribution Map). Habitats include open rocky woodlands, open sandy woodlands, sandy savannas, glades, thickets, sand prairies, and sandy fields. This species is usually found in rather dry areas with sparse ground vegetation. Occasional wildfires are probably beneficial in removing competition from woody vegetation and other tall plants. Faunal Associations
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments: Open dry woodlands, and borders, prairies, roadsides, usually sandy soils.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Small Wild Bean in Illinois

Strophostyles leiosperma (Small Wild Bean)
(Bees visit flowers for nectar; ants & short-tongued bees visit extra-floral nectaries for nectar; observations are from Robertson)

Visit flowers:

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Bombini): Bombus pensylvanica sn; Megachilidae (Megachilini): Megachile brevis brevis sn

Bees (short-tongued)
Andrenidae (Panurginae): Calliopsis andreniformis sn

Visit extra-floral nectaries:

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Lasioglossum imitatus sn, Lasioglossum versatus sn

Ants
Formicidae: Formica schaufussi sn fq

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Phaseolus pauciflorus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data: Strophostyles leiosperma

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Strophostyles leiosperma

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Phaseolus pauciflorus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full or partial sun, mesic to dry conditions, and sandy soil. Conventional garden soil containing loam or clay-loam is tolerated if there is not too much competition from taller plants. The seeds may remain in the ground for several years before they germinate; scarification of the seeds can speed up this process. The roots add nitrogen to the soil by forming a symbiotic association with rhizobial bacteria.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!