Overview

Brief Summary

The soft corals and their relatives (alcyonarians) are abundant and conspicuous components of western Indo-Pacific coral reef communities. Of the soft corals, the strikingly colored species of Dendronephthya are among the most abundant and widespread. They occur in areas periodically exposed to moderate or strong currents, usually below 10 to 15 m depth. When fully expanded, colonies resemble cotton candy, exhibiting dazzling shades of pink, red, blue, purple, yellow, and white. The colonies are densely branched and have a prickly appearance due to the sharp supporting bundles of calcareous particles on each polyp. Dendronephthya species diversity is poorly known and some of the several hundred described species may actually represent intraspecific color variation rather than distinct species. The genus ranges throughout the western Indo-Pacific.

Dendronephthya corals are among the most commonly traded soft corals. Between 1988 and 2002 at least 12,618 Dendronephthya were traded globally (the U.S. was the largest importer, with 51% of the total Dendronephthya trade, and Indonesia was the biggest exporter). However, corals in this genus are poor choices for aquarium hobbyists. They generally die within a few weeks, mainly because they lack photosynthetic "algal" symbionts (zooxanthellae) and must rely instead on filtering food particles and dissolved nutrients from the water column.

(Allen 1997, 2000; Wabnitz 2003)

  • Allen, G. 2000. Marine Life of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Periplus Editions, Tuttle Publishing, North Clarendon, Vermont.
  • Allen, G.A. 1997. Tropical Marine Life. Periplus Editions, Tuttle Publishing, North Clarendon, Vermont.
  • Wabnitz, C. 2003. From ocean to aquarium: the global trade in marine ornamental species. UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre, UNEP/Earthprint, Cambridge, UK.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

Supplier: Leo Shapiro

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 1296 specimens in 93 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 484 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1 - 282.5
  Temperature range (°C): 12.735 - 28.954
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.046 - 26.844
  Salinity (PPS): 33.939 - 40.264
  Oxygen (ml/l): 1.316 - 4.999
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.054 - 1.847
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.380 - 35.088

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 1 - 282.5

Temperature range (°C): 12.735 - 28.954

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.046 - 26.844

Salinity (PPS): 33.939 - 40.264

Oxygen (ml/l): 1.316 - 4.999

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.054 - 1.847

Silicate (umol/l): 0.380 - 35.088
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Evolution and Systematics

Functional Adaptations

Functional adaptation

Strategies prevent biofouling: soft coral
 

Soft corals prevent biofouling by releasing metabolites and encouraging populations of certain bacteria.

   
  "It has been demonstrated in previous studies that the soft corals Dendronephthya sp. can control macrofouling on its surface by the production of secondary metabolites (Kawamata et al., 1994; Wilsanand et al., 1999). Water-soluble, low-molecular-weight substances from the soft coral Dendronephthya sp. inhibited the settlement of larvae of B. [Balanus] amphitrite (Kawamata et al., 1994) and the compound was identical to trigonelline, which belongs to the betaine group. Our previous study showed that the different organic extracts of the soft coral Dendronephthya sp. inhibited the growth and attachment of bacteria from natural biofilm on rocks and that the species composition of the bacteria on the surface of the coral was different from that on inanimate surface (Harder et al., 2003). Three out of eleven bacterial strains isolated from the surface of the Dendronephthya sp. suppressed the growth of indigenous bacteria from natural biofilm. All bacterial isolates associated with the surface of the soft coral were insensitive to coral extracts. These findings suggest that this soft coral may directly inhibit larval settlement by releasing antifouling compounds or indirectly inhibit larval settlement by regulating the growth of some bacteria on the coral surface, which in turn affects larval attachment." (Dobretsov and Qian 2004:45)
  Learn more about this functional adaptation.
  • Dobretsov S; Qian P-Y. 204. The role of epibotic bacteria from the surface of the soft coral Dendronephthya sp. in the inhibition of larval settlement. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. 299(1): 35-50.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© The Biomimicry Institute

Source: AskNature

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:91
Specimens with Sequences:42
Specimens with Barcodes:14
Species:17
Species With Barcodes:8
Public Records:8
Public Species:6
Public BINs:1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Genomic DNA is available from 1 specimen
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Genomic DNA is available from 12 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Queensland Museum
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Genomic DNA is available from 5 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Queensland Museum
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Genomic DNA is available from 4 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Queensland Museum
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Genomic DNA is available from 3 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Queensland Museum
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Genomic DNA is available from 1 specimen with morphological vouchers housed at Queensland Museum
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Genomic DNA is available from 2 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Ocean Genome Legacy
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Genomic DNA is available from 5 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Auckland
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Genomic DNA is available from 9 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Auckland
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Genomic DNA is available from 1 specimen with morphological vouchers housed at Dalhousie University
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Dendronephthya

Dendronephthya is a genus of soft corals in the family Nephtheidae.[2] There are over 250 described species in this genus.

Species[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "WoRMS - World Register of Marine Species - Spongodes". Marinespecies.org. Retrieved 2012-06-05. 
  2. ^ "WoRMS - World Register of Marine Species - Dendronephthya Kuekenthal, 1905". Marinespecies.org. Retrieved 2012-06-05. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!