Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:12Public Records:4
Specimens with Sequences:12Public Species:4
Specimens with Barcodes:11Public BINs:3
Species:4         
Species With Barcodes:4         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Nemopteridae

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Wikipedia

Nemopteridae

Spoonwings or Nemopteridae are a family of neuropteran insects. They are also called Thread-winged Antlions. Their flight is delicate and they have a circling flight to avoid walls when they are trapped indoors. The long streamer is conspicuous when the insects are flying and these are the elongated and spatulate hindwings.

Pinned museum specimen - Muséum of Toulouse

They are found in the Ethiopian, Palearctic, Australasian and Neotropical regions but absent in North America (a fossil has been found in Colorado).[1]

Male Nemopterids have a bulla on the wing usually along the margin or wing base that is used to disperse pheromone.[1]

Taxonomy[edit source | edit]

There are two distinct subfamilies in the Nemopteridae family:

  • Crocinae, mostly nocturnal and crepuscular species with often a narrow habitat preference. They are found in arid desert zones and have a wide distribution along the southern fringes of the west Palearctic and Western Asia, as well as in dry Neotropical, Afrotropical, and Australian areas. Includes the following genera:

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia, 2nd edition. Volume 3, Insects, edited by Michael Hutchins, Arthur V. Evans, Rosser W. Garrison, and Neil Schlager. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Group, 2003.
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