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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Shrub, to 3 m. Leaves alternate, dark dull green and hairless above, densely white-tomentose beneath. Flowers in terminal and axillary heads, white. Fruit a red berry.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Derivation of specific name

pannosus: appearance or texture of felt, referring to the underside of the leaves
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

Worldwide distribution

Native to China; naturalised elsewhere, e.g. in Zimbabwe and S Africa
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

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Sichuan, Yunnan.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs semievergreen, to 2 m tall. Branchlets dark grayish brown or purplish brown, thin, initially densely white tomentose, glabrescent. Petiole 2–7 mm, tomentose; stipules caducous, linear, pubescent; leaf blade narrowly elliptic, elliptic, or ovate, 2–3(–4) × 0.8–1.5 cm, leathery, midvein impressed adaxially, lateral veins 4–6 pairs, abaxially densely white tomentose, adaxially slightly pubescent or glabrous, base broadly cuneate, apex obtuse or acute. Corymbs 1–3 × 1.5–2.5 cm, to 10(–20)-flowered; rachis and pedicels densely tomentose; bracts caducous, linear, pubescent. Pedicel 2–3 mm. Flowers 7–8 mm in diam. Hypanthium campanulate, abaxially densely tomentose. Sepals triangular, apex shortly acuminate or acute. Petals spreading, white, broadly ovate or suborbicular, 3–3.5 mm, base shortly clawed and puberulous adaxially, apex obtuse. Stamens 20, nearly as long as petals; anthers purplish red. Ovary pubescent apically; styles 2(or 3), free, ca. as long as stamens. Fruit dark red, globose or ovoid, 7–8 mm in diam., pyrenes often 2. Fl. Jun, fr. Oct–Nov. 2n = 34*, 68*.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Ecology

Habitat

Thickets, rocky places, waste places in mountain regions, slopes; 1100--3200 m.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Population Biology

Frequency

Common in and near Harare; local elsewhere
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cotoneaster pannosus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cotoneaster pannosus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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© NatureServe

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Cotoneaster pannosus

Cotoneaster pannosus (commonly known as silverleaf cotoneaster') is a species of cotoneaster known by the common name silverleaf cotoneaster. This woody shrub is native to south central China[1] but it has been introduced to other areas of the world, including southern Africa and Australia as an ornamental. It has become naturalized in some areas but it is a troublesome noxious weed in others, for example, in Hawaii. This is a sprawling shrub easily reaching over 3 meters in height. It is covered in dull green oval-shaped leaves with fuzzy white undersides and blooms in white flowers. The fruits are red-orange pomes containing two seeds each. These fruits are very attractive to birds, which are the main agent of seed dispersal. It grows on the elevation of 3,280 feet (1,000 m).[2]

Invasiveness[edit]

It is considered to be an invasive species in California[2] and Oregon.[3]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Flora of China entry for Cotoneaster" (PDF) 9. 2003. pp. 85–108. 
  2. ^ a b "Cotoneaster pannosus". Calflora. Retrieved April 9, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Cotoneaster pannosus Franch. silverleaf cotoneaster". USDA. Plants Profile. Retrieved April 9, 2013. 
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