Overview

Brief Summary

Lorković’s Brassy Ringlet is a satyrine butterfly endemic to the Alps from Slovenia through southern Austria to eastern Italy (De Groot et al 2009). The larvae feed on grasses (Rakosy & Jutzeler 2005). The preferred habitat is undisturbed alpine grassland with patches of bare ground, where the butterflies bask in the sun and feed on minerals (De Groot et al 2009). In Austria, piles of rubble overgrown with grasses are also an important habitat (Rakosy & Jutzeler 2005). Erebia calcaria was listed in Appendix II of the Bern Convention (Council of Europe 1979). Populations are threatened by habitat loss due to cattle grazing and construction of ski resorts (De Groot et al 2009, van Swaay et al 2012).

  • Council of Europe (1979) Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats. [Text of Convention]
  • De Groot M, Rebeusek F, Grobelnik V, Govedic M, Salamun A, Verovnik R (2009) Distribution modelling as an approach to the conservation of a threatened alpine endemic butterfly (Lepidoptera: Satyridae). European Journal of Entomology 106: 77-84.
  • Rakosy L, Jutzeler D (2005) Biologie, Ökologie und Verbreitung des Karawanken-Mohrenfalters Erebia calcaria (Lorkovic, 1949) in Kärnten. Carinthia II 115: 675-690.
  • van Swaay C, Collins S, Dušej G, Maes D, Munguira M, Rakosy L, Ryrholm N, Šašić M, Settele J, Thomas J, Verovnik R, Verstrael T, Warren M, Wiemers M, Wynhoff I (2012) Dos and Don’ts for butterflies of the Habitats Directive of the European Union. Nature Conservation 1: 73-153. doi: 10.3897/natureconservation.1.2786
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Distribution

Range Description

Occurs only in the Alps in the border region of Italy, Slovenia and Austria (Venetian Alps, Julian Alps and Karavanke Mountains.). Found at altitudes between 1,350-2,000 m. This is a European endemic species.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The Lorkovic’s Brassy Ringlet inhabits southern exposed slopes with alpine grassland interspersed with rocks. These butterflies are only active when the sun is shining. They fly close to the ground, visiting flowers from time to time and spend much of their time on rocks, resting. The female deposits her eggs on dry grass stalks, just above the ground. The caterpillars feed on Mat-grass (Nardus stricta) and on different fescues (Festuca spp.). Habitats: alpine and subalpine grasslands (50%), screes (25%), inland cliffs and exposed rocks (25%).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Physiology and Cell Biology

Cell Biology

Chromosome Number

n = 8 (Rakosy & Jutzeler 2005)

  • Rakosy L, Jutzeler D (2005) Biologie, Ökologie und Verbreitung des Karawanken-Mohrenfalters Erebia calcaria (Lorkovic, 1949) in Kärnten. Carinthia II 115: 675-690.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Erebia calcaria

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
van Swaay, C., Wynhoff, I., Verovnik, R., Wiemers, M., López Munguira, M., Maes, D., Sasic, M., Verstrael, T., Warren, M. & Settele, J.

Reviewer/s
Lewis, O. (Butterfly RLA) & Cuttelod, A. (IUCN Red List Unit)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Least Concern, since it has not been declining by more than 25% in the last ten years and its population size is probably larger than 10,000 adult individuals.
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Population

Population
A local species, restricted to (semi-) natural areas.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
Although this is a European endemic with a restricted range, this species is not believed to face major threats at the European level.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The species is listed on the Habitats Directive Annexes 2 and 4 and Bern Convention Annex 2. In Slovenia, the species only occurs in protected areas. In Austria, none of the populations are in Natura 2,000 areas.
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Wikipedia

Erebia calcaria

Lorkovic’s Brassy Ringlet (Erebia calcaria) is a butterfly of the Nymphalidae family. It is found in the Alps.[1] The species inhabits southern exposed slopes with alpine grassland interspersed with rocks. Screes without vegetation or only a few grass tussocks cannot serve as habitat.

Biology[edit]

The species is only active when the sun is shining. They fly close to the ground, visiting flowers from time to time and spend much of their time on rocks, resting. The female deposits her eggs on dry grass stalks, just above the ground. The caterpillars feed on Nardus stricta and on various Festuca and Sesleria species.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Erebia at funet
  2. ^ C. Van Swaay et al. (2012). "Dos and Don'ts for butterflies of the Habitats Directive of the European Union". Nature Conservation 1: 73. doi:10.3897/natureconservation.1.2786. 


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