Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Annual or perennial herbs. Leaves, at least below, opposite and entire, sometimes alternate above. Inflorescences of cymes, panicles or thyrses. Calyx narrow, toothed or lobed, eventually ruptured by the maturing fruit. Corolla showy, salver-shaped; tube narrow and constricted at the throat; lobes obovate to circular. Stamens attached at different heights on the corolla tube. Style usually filiform. Capsule 3-valved, septicidal.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / gall
Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes gall of stem (esp. base) of Phlox

Foodplant / pathogen
Aphelenchoides ritzemabosi infects and damages limp, discoloured leaf of Phlox

Foodplant / pathogen
Ditylenchus dipsaci infects and damages live, reduced leaf (upper) of Phlox

Foodplant / sap sucker
Myzus persicae sucks sap of Phlox

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / saprobe
gregarious, partly buried, erumpent pycnidium of Pyrenochaeta coelomycetous anamorph of Pyrenochaeta phlogis is saprobic on dead stem of Phlox
Remarks: season: 6

Foodplant / pathogen
Rhodococcus fascians infects and damages non-flowering plant of Phlox
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / spot causer
epiphyllous, rather numerous, immersed then erumpent, dull black pycnidium of Septoria coelomycetous anamorph of Septoria divaricatae causes spots on live leaf of Phlox
Remarks: season: 6

Foodplant / spot causer
pycnidium of Septoria coelomycetous anamorph of Septoria drummondii causes spots on live leaf of Phlox

Foodplant / spot causer
epiphyllous, covered, clear brown pycnidium of Septoria coelomycetous anamorph of Septoria phlogis sensu Sacc. & Speg. causes spots on live leaf of Phlox
Remarks: season: 8-10
Other: uncertain

Foodplant / miner
larva of Trypeta zoe mines live leaf of Phlox
Other: unusual host/prey

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:41Public Records:15
Specimens with Sequences:39Public Species:8
Specimens with Barcodes:38Public BINs:0
Species:14         
Species With Barcodes:14         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Phlox

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Phlox

For other uses, see Phlox (disambiguation).

Phlox (/ˈflɒks/; Greek φλόξ "flame"; plural "phlox" or "phloxes", Greek φλόγες phlóges) is a genus of 67 species of perennial and annual plants in the family Polemoniaceae. They are found mostly in North America (one in Siberia) in diverse habitats from alpine tundra to open woodland and prairie. Some flower in spring, others in summer and fall. Flowers may be pale blue, violet, pink, bright red, or white. Many are fragrant.

Fertilized flowers typically produce one relatively large seed. The fruit is a longitudinally dehiscent capsule with three or more valves that sometimes separate explosively.[1]

Some species such as P. paniculata (Garden Phlox) grow upright, while others such as P. subulata (Moss Phlox, Moss Pink, Mountain Phlox) grow short and matlike.

The foliage of Phlox is a food for the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Dot Moth, Gazoryctra wielgusi, Hummingbird Hawk-moth and Schinia indiana (which feeds exclusively on P. pilosa). Phlox species are also a popular food source for groundhogs, rabbits and deer.

Species[edit]

Fruit and seeds of P. paniculata
Clump of woodland phlox (P. divaricata)
Growing at a nursery in Cranford, New Jersey.

There are 68 species, including:

Cultivation[edit]

Several species and cultivars of phlox are commonly grown in gardens. Most cultivated phlox, with the notable exception of Phlox drummondii, are perennial. Species from Alpine habitats (and cultivars derived from them) require full sun and good drainage. Those from woodland habitats (such as P. divaricata) require partial shade and soil rich in humus. Those from waterside habitats (such as P. paniculata) require full sun and moisture at the roots.[2] Phlox are valued in the garden for their ability to attract butterflies. Phlox can be propagated from stem cuttings.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Klaus Kubitzki (2004). Flowering plants, Dicotyledons: Celastrales, Oxalidales, Rosales, Cornales, Ericales. Springer. p. 311. 
  2. ^ Prof. Craigmyle, M., The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Perennials, Salamander Books Ltd, 2002, p222 ISBN 1 901683 78 8
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