Overview

Distribution

Distribution and Habitat

Northern Australia. From the Kimberley region in Western Australia, east through the Northern Territory and northern Queensland in Eurimbulah National Park.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 586000 km2.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Davies, M. and Watson, G.F. (1994). ''Morphology and reproductive biology of Limnodynastes salmini, L. convexiusculus and Megistolotis lignarius (Anura: Leptodactylidae: Limnodynastinae).'' Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, 118(3), 149–169.
  • Margules, C.R., Davies, K.F., Meyers, J.A., and Milkovits, G.A. (1995). ''The responses of some selected arthropods and the frog Crinia signifera to habitat fragmentation.'' Conserving Biodiversity: Threats and Solutions. Surrey Beatty and Sons, Sydney, 94-103.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:128
Specimens with Sequences:119
Specimens with Barcodes:119
Species:5
Species With Barcodes:5
Public Records:1
Public Species:1
Public BINs:1
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Barcode data

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Conservation

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Usually in swampy areas among long grass. Low-lying areas exposed to seasonal flooding.Breeds between October and March. Males call from concealed positions at the base of grass tussocks, in debris or in vacated burrows of freshwater crabs. Eggs are deposited in a floating foam nest in temporary pools.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Davies, M. and Watson, G.F. (1994). ''Morphology and reproductive biology of Limnodynastes salmini, L. convexiusculus and Megistolotis lignarius (Anura: Leptodactylidae: Limnodynastinae).'' Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, 118(3), 149–169.
  • Margules, C.R., Davies, K.F., Meyers, J.A., and Milkovits, G.A. (1995). ''The responses of some selected arthropods and the frog Crinia signifera to habitat fragmentation.'' Conserving Biodiversity: Threats and Solutions. Surrey Beatty and Sons, Sydney, 94-103.
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Threats

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No known declines and large extent of occurrence (>20,000km2).

Threats
None known.

Conservation Measures
Protected where it occurs in National Parks as in Queensland.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Davies, M. and Watson, G.F. (1994). ''Morphology and reproductive biology of Limnodynastes salmini, L. convexiusculus and Megistolotis lignarius (Anura: Leptodactylidae: Limnodynastinae).'' Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, 118(3), 149–169.
  • Margules, C.R., Davies, K.F., Meyers, J.A., and Milkovits, G.A. (1995). ''The responses of some selected arthropods and the frog Crinia signifera to habitat fragmentation.'' Conserving Biodiversity: Threats and Solutions. Surrey Beatty and Sons, Sydney, 94-103.
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Wikipedia

Limnodynastes

Limnodynastes (commonly known as the Australian swamp frogs) is a genus of frog native to Australia, southern New Guinea and some Torres Strait Islands. They are ground-dwelling frogs, with no toe pads. The size varies from 45 mm to 90 mm in the Giant Banjo Frog. The webbing on the feet ranges between species, from very little, to almost complete. The tympanum is not visible in any species, except in the Woodworker Frog, which is sometimes classed in a separate genus Megistolotis. All species construct a foam nest in which the eggs are laid. However in south-eastern South Australia female Striped Marsh Frog and Spotted Grass Frog lack the flanges of skin on the hands that helps trap the air bubble and do not construct foam nests.

Species[edit]

Following a major revision of amphibians in 2006,[1] two species, the Ornate Burrowing Frog, Opisthodon ornatus and Spencer’s Burrowing Frog, Opisthodon spenceri, were moved to the resurrected genus Opisthodon. This reduced the number of member species to eleven.

Common nameBinomial name
Marbled FrogLimnodynastes convexiusculus (Macleay, 1878)
Flat-headed FrogLimnodynastes depressus (Tyler, 1976)
Western Banjo Frog
or Pobblebonk
Limnodynastes dorsalis (Gray, 1841)
Eastern Banjo FrogLimnodynastes dumerilii (Peters, 1863)
Long-thumbed FrogLimnodynastes fletcheri (Boulenger, 1888)
Giant Banjo FrogLimnodynastes interioris (Fry, 1913)
Woodworker FrogLimnodynastes lignarius (Tyler, Martin, and Davies, 1979)
Striped Marsh Frog
or Brown-striped Frog
Limnodynastes peronii (Duméril and Bibron, 1841)
Salmon-striped FrogLimnodynastes salmini (Steindachner, 1867)
Spotted Grass FrogLimnodynastes tasmaniensis (Günther, 1858)
Northern Banjo FrogLimnodynastes terraereginae (Fry, 1915)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Frost, D. R.; Grant, T.; Faivovich, J.; Bain, R. H.; Haas, A.; Haddad, C. F.; et al. (2006). "The amphibian tree of life". Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History (297): 1–370. 
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