Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (200,000-2,500,000 square km (about 80,000-1,000,000 square miles)) Burch (1989) lists several species in the Campeloma decisum complex giving a broad distribution for all as eastern North America, from Nova Scotia, southern Ontario and southern Manitoba south to Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, northern Georgia, and Virginia.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat Type: Freshwater

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Associations

Known predators

Campeloma decisum (Campeloma decisum mollusc) is prey of:
Hirundinidae
Perca flavescens
Micropterus salmoides
Ambloplites rupestris
Pomoxis nigromaculatus
Umbra

Based on studies in:
USA: Wisconsin, Little Rock Lake (Lake or pond)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Martinez ND (1991) Artifacts or attributes? Effects of resolution on the Little Rock Lake food web. Ecol Monogr 61:367–392
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Known prey organisms

Campeloma decisum (Campeloma decisum mollusc) preys on:
fine organic matter

Based on studies in:
USA: Wisconsin, Little Rock Lake (Lake or pond)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Martinez ND (1991) Artifacts or attributes? Effects of resolution on the Little Rock Lake food web. Ecol Monogr 61:367–392
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: > 300

Comments: This species is nearly ubiquitous throughout the Atlantic coastal plain of Georgia (Dillon et al., 2006), North Carolina (Dillon et al., 2006), and South Carolina (Dillon and Stewart, 2003). In Alabama it is widespread in the Tennessee River system across the state (Mirarchi et al., 2004). McGregor et al. (1999) documented it in Pintialla Creek, in the Alabama River, Alabama. It occurs in ponds, creeks and the Savannah River on property of the Savannah River Power Plant, Aiken, South Carolina (Wood, 1982). In North Carolina, it is distributed statewide (Dawley, 1965). Branson and Batch (1987) documented it in Kentucky in the Cumberland (Bell and McCreary Cos.), Licking (Bath Co.) and Kentucky drainages (Elkhorn River in Scott Co.). It is known from the Glady Fork River in West Virginia (Schwartz and Meredith, 1962). It was recently found in the Ohio River at several sites from Lock and Dam 52 and Smithland (Illinois/Kentucky), Newburgh and Markland (Indiana/Kentucky), to Belleville (Ohio/West Virginia) (Tom Jones, Marshall University, pers. comm., 2008). In Pennsylvania, it occurs in the Delaware, Ohio, Potomac, and Susquehanna basins (principally northwest and south central) (Evans and Ray, 2010). In Indiana, it was recenlty found at 11 sites (and 20 historical collections) in lakes and rivers throughout the state (Pyron et al., 2008). In a study of clonal diversity, Johnson and Leefe (1999) utilized specimens from rivers draining into Lake Pontchartrain in Louisiana to the Pascagoula River in Mississippi (Twelve-mile Creek, Colyell Bay, Natalbany River, Big Creek, Tchefuncta River, Pearl River, White Sandy Creek, Pascagoula River). Minton et al. (2008) documented it in the Bayou Bartholomew drainage in Arkansas. Pearce and Evans (2008) documented it in Plummers Island (Middle Potomac River system), Maryland. Only one remaining population exists in Manitoba (E. Pip, pers. comm., May 2008). Branson (1966) documented it in the Spring River in Kansas and Missouri, however, Angelo et al. (2002) could find no evidence recently of the species in Kansas and concluded Kansas records are mis-identified Campeloma crasulum (however they did not cite Branson et al., 1966).

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Global Abundance

>1,000,000 individuals

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

It appears parthenogenesis arose spontaneously in Campeloma decisum (and in other species of Campeloma) in the absence of hybridization, followed by strong selection from parasitic castration of males by a digenetic trematode, Leucochloridiomorpha constantiae; as well as by hybridization (Johnson, 1992). For example, independent origins of triploid hybrid parthenogens in the Florida panhandle occurred by hybridization between an Atlantic coastal species (Campeloma limum or Campeloma floridense) and the Florida sexual species (Campeloma geniculum). Allozyme genotypic diversity is similar between these hybrid parthenogens and sexuals (Johnson and Leefe, 1999).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Burch (1989) lists several species in the Campeloma decisum complex giving a broad distribution for all as eastern North America, from Nova Scotia, southern Ontario and southern Manitoba south to Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, northern Georgia, and Virginia. This species has a wide distribution, presumed large population, occurrence in a number of protected areas, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, tolerance to habitat modification, lack of substantial immediate threats, and because it is not in decline or is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

Environmental Specificity: Broad. Generalist or community with all key requirements common.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: Low

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Management

Global Protection: Unknown whether any occurrences are appropriately protected and managed

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Uses

Comments: The trematode fluke, Sanguinicola occidentalis, was found in 33% of snails examined from Silver Creek, Michigan in 1999.

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Wikipedia

Campeloma decisum

Campeloma decisum, common name the pointed campeloma, is a species of freshwater snail with an operculum, an aquatic gastropod mollusk in the family Viviparidae.

Right lateral view of a shell of Campeloma decisum

References

  • ITIS info at: [1]
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: This probably represents more than one species. Specimens of actual Campeloma decisum from the east coastal drainage do not resemble specimens from the Interior Basin, which may be Campeloma integrum. The populations in Arkansas may be an undescribed species (Mark Gordon, pers. comm., 1993). Dillon et al. (2006) believe Campeloma regulare, Campeloma geniculatum, and Campeloma limum are synonymous with Campeloma decisum because there appear to be no reliable distinguishable morphological characters between them. In the case of southeastern Campeloma species, parthenogenesis appears to have originated spontaneously from sexual ancestors rather than by interspecific hybridization (Johnson and Leefe, 1999). These parthogens originated recently from sexuals (Atlantic coastal Campeloma limum or Campeloma floridence) and dispersed into new isolated river drainages (Gulf Coast and Florida panhandle), possibly during the Pleistocene glacial periods. Different species of Campeloma evolved in this region and some are parthenogenic (Campeloma decisum in part, Campeloma parthenum, Campeloma limum in part) and some sexual (Campeloma decisum in part, Campeloma geniculum, Campeloma floridense, Campeloma limum in part) (Johnson and Bragg, 1999; Johnson, 2000).

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