IUCN threat status:

Not evaluated

Comprehensive Description

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Dicerandra immaculata is a rare and endangered species of mint that grows to a height of approximately 50 cm (1.6 feet). Young plants and those growing in open sunlight have an erect growth habit and may form dense mats, while older plants and ones growing in shaded areas are arching or sprawling. Leaves are opposite (but may appear to be whorled) and linear to narrowly oblong in shape, with inrolled margins and rounded tips (FNAI 2006; Nelson 1996). Leaves measure 1.5 - 3 cm (0.6 - 1.2 inches) in length and 2 - 4 mm (0.07 - 0.16 inches) in width. Both the upper and lower surfaces of the leaves are covered with fine dots. Flowers are two-lipped and tubular in shape, measuring 1.5 - 2 cm (0.6 - 0.8 inches) in length. Color ranges from pink to rose or lavender, and there are no spots on the petals, a trait that differs from most other Dicerandra species. Anthers are white, and extend beyond the flower. Stamens are spurred. The inflorescence is 15-25 cm (5.9 - 9.8 inches) long and has overlapping cymes, each bearing 1,3 or 5 flowers (Kral 1982) in leaf axils. Fruit is a pale-colored, rounded nutlet approximately 1mm (0.04 inches) in length.

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Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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