Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: It occurs in Texas (near Rio Grande in Presidio and Brewster Cos. and along river below Laredo in Webb Co.) and Mexico (from Chihuahua to Nuevo Leon and Zacatecas).

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Range Description

The species occurs in the states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, San Luis Potosí, Zacatecas in Mexico, and in Texas in the USA (Hernández et al. 2004). The species is reported at elevations of 800 to 2,100 m asl (Pilbeam 1999).
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Tex.; Mexico (Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Nuevo León, Zacatecas).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants usually branched. Roots diffuse; upper portion not enlarged. Stems narrowly cylindric or clavate, 6-15(-30) × (1.5-)2-3.5(-4.5) cm, firm; tubercles 3-5 × 3-5 mm; axils with abundant, persistent, white wool, longest in flowering zone (where exceeding tubercle tips); cortex and pith not mucilaginous; latex absent. Spines (33-)43-60 per areole, white to gray, tan, or pale reddish (central spines with darker, usually chalky blue tips), glabrous; radial spines (27-)37-49 per areole, white or pale tan, bristlelike, 3-6 × 0.05-0.1 mm, stiff, contrasting sharply with robust central spines; central spines 6-12 per areole, straight or weakly recurving throughout their lengths, not hooked, all ± projecting, abaxial and lateral central spines straighter and shorter, 5-8 mm, adaxial central spines 10-15 mm, all 0.2-0.3 mm diam. Flowers 0.9-1.5 × 0.6-1.3 cm; outermost tepal margins toothed; inner tepals maroon-red to rusty red or reddish purple, with paler margins, 4 × 1.5 mm; stigma lobes dull pinkish white to reddish purple or orange-yellow, 1 mm. Fruits bright red, cylindric-clavate, 15-20 mm, juicy only in fruit walls; floral remnant persistent. Seeds light to dark brown, 1-1.2 mm, pitted; testa hard; anticlinal cell walls deeply sinuate; interstices narrower than pit diameters; pits irregularly bowl-shaped. 2n = 22.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: It occurs on gravelly areas of hills and washes in desert at 750-900 m.

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species grows in flaking limestone with little if any humus. It occurs in pure limestone crevices (Pilbeam 1999) in xerophyllous scrub. It also grows in gravelly areas of hills and washes in desert.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Chihuahuan desert scrub with Agave lechuguilla and Larrea, gravelly flats, rocky slopes, on limestone or additional substrates]; 700-1300[-2100]m.
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20

Comments: Ten EO's (Benson 1982).

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering (Feb-Mar, rarely later); fruiting Apr.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Heil, K., Terry, M., Goettsch, B.K. & Corral-Díaz, R.

Reviewer/s
Superina, M.

Contributor/s

Justification

Mammillaria pottsii has a very wide range, is abundant, and there are no major threats. Hence, it is listed as Least Concern.

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Population

Population
The species is common and abundant throughout its range.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Comments: Most cacti subject to horticultural collecting.

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Major Threats
There are no known major threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The species occurs in the Big Bend National Park in Texas (Pilbeam 1999).
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Wikipedia

Mammillaria pottsii

Mammillaria pottsii, also known as fox-tail cactus or rat-tail nipple cactus, is a species of flowering plant in the Cactaceae family.[1] It was first described by Scheer ex Salm-Dyck, Cact. Hort. 1849: 104 (1850)[2] According to the United Nations Environment Programme, M. leona is a synonym for M. pottsii.[3]

References


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Notes

Comments

Mammillaria pottsii superficially resembles Coryphantha subgen. Escobaria: the erect cylindric stems are totally concealed by short, pale gray or ashy white spines. In M. pottsii, the ring of reproductive structures (flowers or fruits) encircles the stem two centimeters or more below the stem apex, unlike the apical flowers and fruits of most coryphanthas.
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