Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:7
Specimens with Sequences:7
Specimens with Barcodes:7
Species:1
Species With Barcodes:1
Public Records:7
Public Species:1
Public BINs:6
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Aglyptodactylus

Aglyptodactylus is a genus of frogs in the family Mantellidae. These frogs, sometimes known as the Madagascar jumping frogs, are endemic to Madagascar.[1] One species occurs in humid eastern Madagascar whereas two other species are found in the dryer western Madagascar.[2]

Description[edit]

Aglyptodactylus are medium-sized frogs as adults, measuring 35–60 mm (1.4–2.4 in) in snout–vent length.[2]

Tadpoles[edit]

All three Aglyptodactylus species have small, morphologically similar tadpoles that metamorphose at a size of 7–15 mm (0.28–0.59 in). However, they differ in their habitat, ranging from ephemeral pools (Aglyptodactylus laticeps) to river bed pools (Aglyptodactylus securifer) to stagnant pools (Aglyptodactylus madagascariensis). The tadpoles are detritivorous.[3]

Species[edit]

There are three Aglyptodactylus species:[1]

A fourth, as yet undescribed species may exist in southern Madagascar.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Frost, Darrel R. (2013). "Aglyptodactylus Boulenger, 1919". Amphibian Species of the World 5.6, an Online Reference. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 9 January 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Glaw, F.; Vences, M.; Böhme, W. (1998). "Systematic revision of the genus Aglyptodactylus Boulenger, 1919 (Amphibia: Ranidae), and analysis of its phylogenetic relationships to other Madagascan ranid genera (Tomopterna, Boophis, Mantidactylus, and Mantella)". Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research 36: 17–37. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0469.1998.tb00775.x.  edit
  3. ^ Glos, J.; Linsenmair, K. E. (2004). "Descriptions of the tadpoles of Aglyptodactylus laticeps and Aglyptodactylus securifer from western Madagascar, with notes on life history and ecology". Journal of Herpetology 38: 131–136. doi:10.1670/47-03.  edit
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!